Home >> Audience >> Undergraduate

Undergraduate

By Gabriela Martínez

Angélique Kidjo, Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter and activist from Benin, visited the University of Maryland for the WORLDWISE: Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series to talk about her life story and the role of music in activism. 

As soon as she walked onstage and sat down for her live discussion with Sheri Parks, associate dean of University of Maryland’s College of Arts and Humanities, Angélique Kidjo looked at the audience and said “You are all so quiet. We’re talking about art, man.”

Using her own lively stories about her childhood in a village in Benin, Kidjo captured the audience and lightened the mood.  An inquisitive child—known affectionately in her village as “Where, what and how?”—Kidjo was privileged for having parents who greatly valued her intellectual development.

Kidjo’s mother, a skilled costume designer, created a theater in her community.  As a child, Kidjo would spend time climbing in and out of the animal costumes her mother made. One night, when her mother did not have enough actors between scenes, she made Kidjo go onstage.  Not knowing what to do, Kidjo decided to belt out a song.

It was after that moment that Kidjo decided that she wanted to spend her life onstage.

When asked what it feels like to be the queen of African music, Kidjo responded  “I don’t believe in kings or queens.”

She said her nature is to defy structures of power, which she did after deciding to leave Benin, having realized that the country’s communist regime was not going to foster her creativity and desire to grow intellectually. 

Escaping Benin was not easy, she said. At the time, citizens who wanted to leave the country needed to get authorization from the government. Kidjo, however, was lucky. Her brother’s friend, who was working as airport security at the time, let her board the plane while his supervisor was in the bathroom.

“I’ve never ran so fast in my life,” Kidjo said.

When Kidjo arrived in France, she experienced racism and cultural estrangement in French society, and at the educational institution she graduated from—the CIM Jazz School of Paris.

On her way to register at the school, Kidjo asked for directions from two students.

“Jazz is not for African people,” one of the students told her.

The head of the school, having overheard what the girls had said to Kidjo, told Kidjo that she could prove those students wrong. At the end of the school year, he introduced her to the person who produced her debut album “Parakou.”

Since then, Kidjo’s fame has skyrocketed. She won her first Grammy in 2008 for her album “Djin Djin” and was named one of the 40 most powerful celebrities in Africa by Forbes.

Kidjo also discussed her work with the Batonga Foundation for Girls in Africa, which aims to empower girls and young women in Africa through educational opportunities. Kidjo is currently working on a cellphone-based program that collects information about girls in different African villages and maps it out according to different locations.

The purpose of the program is to find out how girls are living, if they are in school, forcefully married, or going through other types of difficult living situations. Kidjo’s foundation will develop an educational approach for girls based on the needs of the community reflected through the data.

For Kidjo, the first step in creating humanitarian programs for Africa, is giving voices to people and finding out what are their genuine needs.

“I don’t believe anyone can make any change in Africa if the African people are not in the center of the change,” Kidjo said.  “If you don’t ask them what they need, how can you bring a program that makes any sense to people?”

After the discussion, Moses Namara ‘16, a computer science major originally from Uganda, asked Kidjo for advice on how to improve the education system in different African countries.

In response to Namara’s question, Kidjo advocated for the role of youth in a country’s social and educational development, at the same time warning against starting revolutions and “breaking a system” without a plan.

“The platform is there—use it wisely,” said Kidjo, who is optimistic about the power of the Internet, but also wary about its potential to isolate people.

 After graduating from the University of Maryland, Namara will return to Uganda to teach basic programming classes at different local universities, including the Kampala International University.

Toward the end of the program, students gathered around Kidjo to discuss issues of colonialism and social injustice in Africa.

“She is very engaging,” said Peace Gwam ‘17, an economics and history major. “I like that she really called us to action as young students.”

Soulyana Lakew ’17, an economics major originally from Ethiopia, is interested in the role of the western world in the development of Africa.

“It is so refreshing to meet people with integrity,” Lakew said. “A lot of the role models we are given in society are so corrupt. To find someone who is able to use their voice for good and who is true to their word is so inspiring.”

 

12/6/15

By Sydney Tonic, The Diamondback

Photo Courtesy of Victoria Robinson

The arts and humanities college partnered with the Office of Diversity & Inclusion and the Office of International Affairs to foster a discussion about the ongoing refugee crisis in the country and what students at this university can do to help.

Sheri Parks, the director for the Center for Synergy and the associate dean for research and interdisciplinary programming in the arts and humanities college, organized the “Thinkathon,” hoping to implement a “think and do” model to involve students in the discussion.

About 15 students gathered for the workshop Friday morning in Stamp Student Union.

“We believe that, along with faculty and staff, students care about major issues of our time, such as the refugee crisis,” Parks said. “We have students here who have been refugees or are the children of refugees.”

Yasmine Taeb, a legislative representative for human rights and civil liberties at the Friends Committee on National Legislation, spoke about the crisis and its human impact at the event. She said the present crisis is devastating and more than 8 million refugees are internally displaced in Syria.

As part of the committee, Taeb lobbies and advocates about refugee-related issues with congressional offices in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate. 

“Refugees coming to the U.S. are by far the most scrutinized community of entrance to the U.S.,” Taeb said. “We just don’t feel as though the U.S.’s response to the crisis has been adequate; their response has been quite tepid, at best.” 

Hiba Salih, program manager for youth and health at the International Rescue Committee in Baltimore, and Tyler Stoddard, its development coordinator, also came to talk about the work they do for refugees. Salih, a former refugee from Sudan, explained the difficulties of the life of a refugee coming to this country.

“The major challenges are the trauma that they have been through,” Salih said. “Having to adapt to a new country, new systems … they haven’t seen civilization.”

Read more here

The Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy and the James A. Clark School for Engineering are sponsoring a contest to design containers for art therapy kits that we are calling Art in Box.

Art in a Box are kits that contain a collection of art and play materials selected by child psychiatrists and trauma specialists. These kits enable children to cope with the stress of trauma through creative expression and will be shipped internationally to different schools and educational institutions, as well as refugee camps. Students must compete in teams made up of two or more colleges, with at least one member from the College of Arts and Humanities and one member from the School of Engineering.

The winners will receive $5,000 in prize money.

Requirements:

The participants of this contest will have the unique task of creating a container that is visually appealing and can be used for displaying and creating art. The container must be resilient enough to withstand international shipping and made with materials that would allow them to be manufactured at a low cost.

Containers should have a maximum length, width and height of 50” x 22”x 24.”

Entries can be submitted to arhusynergy@umd.edu in the form of design documents. While not required, prototypes may be delivered to 1102 Frances Scott Key Hall.

Deadline for the design: STAY TUNED: We are extending the March 1, 2016 deadline and will relaunch this initiative in the fall with a fall 2016 deadline for submissions. 

Click here for flyer.

WHAT:

The WORLDWISE: Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series features a discussion between Angélique Kidjo and Sheri Parks, associate dean in the College of Arts and Humanities, in which Kidjo will talk about her life story, including her reasons for escaping Benin’s former leftist regime to pursue her dream of becoming an artist in Paris. She will also talk about what it means to be the “queen of African music” and her fervent activism around women and girls in Africa.

The discussion will also explore the idea of cultural rights in the lives of refugees, taking into account the United Nations’ recognition of culture as a human right.

Prior to the lecture, the  Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy led by Sheri Parks will host a ThinkAThon for Refugees: A Think and Do Day of Intellectual Activism, in which Yasmine Taeb from Friends’ National Committee for Legislation will brief participants on the ongoing refugee crises. Two representatives from the International Rescue Committee will provide briefings on the current refugee crisis in Baltimore, which is one of largest receiver cities of refugees in the Unites States.

The briefings will be followed by group discussions, in which participants will examine specific issues and think of solutions to alleviate the plight of refugees.

The event is co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Office of International Affairs.

Lunch will be provided. Participants should register, but walk-ins are welcome.

WHO:

Sheri Parks, Associate Dean for Research, Interdisciplinary Scholarship and Programming in the College of Arts and Humanities

Angelique Kidjo, singer-songwriter and activist from Benin, Africa

Growing up in Benin, Africa, Kidjo was influenced by the sounds and rhythms of Beninese traditional music, as well as jazz, pop, and salsa music. Through her dynamic collaborations with composers such as Philip Glass, Kidjo strives to combine African music with different musical styles.

Kidjo was named one of the 40 most powerful celebrities in Africa by Forbes and one of the 100 most inspiring women in the world by The Guardian. As the founder of the Batonga Foundation for Girls in Africa and is Goodwill Ambassador for UNICEF, Kidjo is dedicated to empowering the lives of African women.

WHEN:

5:30 - 7 p.m. (WORLDWISE: Arts and Humanities Dean’S Lecture Series)

9 a.m. - 2 p.m. (ThinkAThon for Refugees)

WHERE:

The ThinkAThon for Refugees will be held in the Charles Carroll Room at the Adele H. Stamp Student Union, University of Maryland, College Park.

The WORLDWISE: Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture with Sheri Parks and Angélique Kidjo will take place in the Gildenhorn Recital Hall in The Clarice, University of Maryland, College Park. 

Zupnik Lecture Hall, Rm. 1110, Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building
Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 5:00 PM

This year's Whiting-Turner Lecture features Kevin Apperson, who will discuss how he hires artists, humanists and engineers who work together to develop healthcare technology solutions that work for both patients and doctors.

9/25/15

Written by Alex Carolan, The Writer's Bloc

Photo Courtesy of Victoria Robinson

We live in an age where technology is constantly evolving. 

Tech gurus and entrepreneurs are creating and programming new devices that have previously been unimaginable. 

Huang Yi, a native of Taiwan, presents a tangible piece of technology, a fresh invention the public has yet to experience.

Yi programs a robot named Kuka and performs dance routines with it at different venues. 

Sheri Parks, the College of Arts and Humanities associate dean for research moderated a talk with Huang Yi Thursday in Gildenhorn Recital Hall at The Clarice about his experiences in dance, programming and life. 

Students and staff were also involved in the conversation, and were encouraged to ask questions. 

Bowen Gong, a freshman mathematics major asked Yi if he had a nickname for the robot, because “Kuka” is the name of the model – not the individual device. 

“It’s really easy for me to relate my emotions to many items,” Yi said. “So I try not to name them.”

The crowd of around 60 spectators were once again captivated by Yi’s summations of his own life and technology.

Yi said he is limited to certain movements in dancing, as a human, but his robot Kuka is not. 

“[It’s like] I’m beginning to learn how to be a human,” he said. 

Yi attended Thailand University of the Arts for 11 years, from just after completing high school to when he completed his MFA, he said. He was isolated to that one area because of financial concerns and lackluster travel options.

Read and watch video here

 

9/27/15

By Miranda Jackson, The Diamondback

Highly acclaimed Taiwanese choreographer and dancer Huang Yi came to the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center with one seemingly crazy concept: a piece of choreography designed around a robot named KUKA.

Many years ago, when Yi was a child, his family underwent a drastic lifestyle change when his parents had to file for bankruptcy. As his artist statement reads: “My family of four moved from a luxurious house to a 40-square-foot room.”

The constant moving that he experienced put a lot of stress on his parents, so much so that they often attempted suicide. In order to relieve his parents of anymore potential stress, Yi detached himself from all his emotions, a very common defense mechanism among children. He became a perfect child, like a robot, with hardly any personality left at all.

Perhaps this is why he connected so well with the atmosphere of robotics. His favorite television program growing up was a cartoon called Doraemon, which Yi explains as a “Japanese animation character and a cat robot who is always there to solve problems for his owner.” Robots became a passion of his from a very young age, as he identified with their loyalty and selfless destiny.

As an adult, he decided that he wanted to combine two divergent concepts: the science of mechanical engineering and the art of dance, as he grew up with a passion for both. His show featured four members: himself, dancer Lin Jou-Wen, dancer Hu Chien and German robot KUKA. Yi didn’t build this robot; he simply programmed it after receiving it from the company, which was in itself an ordeal.

Read more here.

The University of Maryland College of Arts and Humanities presents WORLDWISE Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series: In Conversation with Sheri Parks. This year’s Dean’s Lecture Series features Huang Yi, a dancer, choreographer, inventor and videographer from Taipei, Taiwan.

In an additional event on Sept. 24, ArtistTalk: Manipulating Data for Performance, Huang Yi will be interviewed by professor Satyandra K. Gupta, director of the Maryland Robotics Center in UMD's Institute for Systems Research.

WHO

Huang Yi’s work focuses on the relationship between humans and machines, and how they are becoming more interrelated. His dance performances integrate human and mechanical movements in a synchronized manner. According to Sozo Artists website, his work has received considerable praise at international arts festivals, including the Ars Electronica Festival (Austria), Joyce Theater, Engien-Les-Bain Centre des Arts (France), Nimbus Dance Works (Jersey City), Cloud Gate 2 (Taipei), the Indonesian Dance Festival (Jakarta), New York Live Arts and the American Dance Festival (North Carolina).

Sheri Parks is an associate professor at the Department of American studies and associate dean for Research, Interdisciplinary Scholarship and Programming at the College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU), which is dedicated to advancing interdisciplinary research and scholarship in the arts and humanities.

EVENT DETAILS

WORLDWISE Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series: In Conversation with Sheri Parks -5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 23.

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, Gildenhorn Recital Hall

For free tickets or more information, visit: go.umd.edu/HYi or call 301.405.ARTS.

Facebook event page here

ArtistTalk: Manipulating Data for Performance- 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 24

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, Kogod Theatre

MEDIA

For more information about this event, please contact Nicky Everette, director of marketing and communications for the College of Arts and Humanities, at meve@umd.edu or 301-405-6714.

Media should RSVP to meve@umd.edu.

Below is a list of enrichment opportunities for ARHU faculty, staff and students for spring 2016. We hope you will be able to join us for some of these exciting events. Please consider incorporating some of these events into your syllabi and pass these opportunities along to your students. A copy of these events is available for download here. If you have something you would like to be included in this listing, please email arhusynergy@umd.edu.

 

Do Good Challenge: Course Support Micro-Grant Funds Available
Request for Proposals Deadline: Dec. 21, 2015
The Do Good Challenge is an eight-week social innovation challenge that inspires students to apply their creativity, skills, and passion to address pressing social challenges on campus and around the world. During the challenge, students team up to analyze a pressing social issue, take action through volunteering, fundraisers, advocacy, or start their own social enterprises. This year they are launching a new initiative which provides funds ($500 to $2000) and resources to faculty who are interested in incorporating the Do Good Challenge into spring 2016 courses. Contact Katlin Meissinger, katmeiss@umd.edu for more info.

Artist Partner Program
NextLOOK: Clown Cabaret

Fri. Jan. 22, 2016, 7:00pm; Joe’s Movement Emporium
Pay what you want, no tickets required
Clown Cabaret, who will be in residency at Joe’s Movement Emporium from January 18–22, 2016, works in an evolving art form that celebrates a universal sense of fun. Through performance, workshops and audience interaction, Clown Cabaret keeps the tradition alive as they develop their newest work.

Artist Partner Program
ODC DANCE: “Stay In One Place” Workshop

Thurs. Jan.28, 2016, 3:30pm; The Clarice, Rever Rehearsal Studio
Free, Registration Recommended
Workshop that illuminates the natural environment through sculpture and movement.

DeVos Institute of Arts Management Internships
Applications accepted on a rolling basis through January 29, 2016
The DeVos Institute of Arts Management is currently accepting applications for Spring 2016 Internships. Students gain valuable experience in event management, program management, and industry research by supporting the Institute’s domestic and international training programs. Interested students may send a resume and cover letter to Syrah Gunning at sgunning@umd.edu.

Recital featuring Andrés Cárdenes, violin; Rita Sloan, piano
Tuesday, February 2, 2016, 8:00pm; Gildenhorn Recital Hall
Free, no tickets required
Grammy-nominated artist Andrés Cárdenes parlays his myriad talents into one of classical music’s most versatile careers. An intensely passionate and personally charismatic artist, Cuban-born Cárdenes has garnered international acclaim from critics and audiences alike for his compelling performances as a violinist, conductor, violist, chamber musician, concertmaster, and recording artist.

Artist Partner Program, UMD School of Music
Ursula Oppens: Piano Master Class

Wed. Feb. 3, 2016, 7:00pm; The Clarice, Gildenhorn Recital Hall
Free, No tickets required
Ursula Oppens will coach students from piano studios in the UMD School of Music.

Ursula Oppens’s Artist-Partner Recital
Thursday, February 4, 8:00pm; Gildenhorn Recital Hall
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
Praised by the San Francisco Chronicle for her "steely fingers and tender, inviting sense of lyricism infused… with athleticism and grace," Ursula Oppens has long been recognized as the leading champion of contemporary American piano music.

She is a four-time Grammy nominee who has performed with virtually all of the world’s major orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony Orchestra and the London Philharmonic. Prolific as a chamber musician as well as a soloist, Oppens has collaborated with the JACK, Juilliard and Pacifica Quartets.

NextLOOK: Clown Cabaret
Friday, February 5, 2016, 7:00pm; Joe's Movement Emporium
Pay what you want, no tickets required
Clown is an evolving art form which celebrates a universal sense of fun. Through performance, workshops, and audience interaction, Clown Cabaret keeps the tradition alive with laughter. During the company’s NextLOOK residency, they will continue developing their newest work. In The Heist, a trio of menacing gangsters conspires to execute the Greatest Robbery of the 21st Century: a piggy bank. A film noir motif carries the story without dialogue, making the show accessible to audiences regardless of language or age. The Heist is a robust physical comedy, with nods to both high and low art ranging from French Surrealism to Bugs Bunny.

Artist Partner Program
Deke Sharon Master Classes
Wed. Feb. 10, 2016, 5:00pm; The Clarice, Dekelboum Concert Hall
Thurs. Feb. 11, 2016, 7:00pm; The Clarice, Dekelboum Concert Hall
Free, Registration Recommended
Two public master classes taught by Deke Sharon, the father of contemporary a cappella.

PANEL: Careers in Writing, Publishing & Editing
Mon. Feb. 15, 2016, 5:00-6:00pm; University Career Center, 3100 Hornbake Library, South Wing
Free, Registration Required
Interested in an internship or career using writing or editing skills? Learn more and network with panelists in a variety of fields that value strong written communication skills. Panelists will be named closer to the date. Open to all undergraduate and graduate students, as well as alumni. Please RSVP here http://go.umd.edu/pnlwriting or email Kate Juhl at kjuhl@umd.edu.

Artist Partner Program
Vocalosity: The Aca-Perfect Concert Experience
Fri. Feb. 19, 2016, 8:00pm; The Clarice, Dekelboum Concert Hall
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
From the movies to television, a cappella is soaring in popularity. Vocalosity captures this excitement live onstage at The Clarice. Deke Sharon, producer for Pitch Perfect and NBC’s “The Sing-Off,” gathers the world’s best singers for an ‘Aca-Perfect’ musical experience. For added fun, UMD a cappella groups will audition to be an opening act for this special evening.

Artist Partner Program
InnovatorTalk: Art and Community Development
Sat. Feb. 20. 2016, 1:00pm; Brentwood Arts Exchange
Free, Registration Recommended
City Blossoms, a non-profit dedicated to kid-driven, community-engaging, creative green spaces, was founded by UMD alum Lola Bloom. Specializing in an art-based, hands-on approach, Bloom will give an overview of the group’s evolution, and lead participants through activities that demonstrate her unique approach to learning.

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies
BALTIMORE: Big Ten New Play Initiative
Fri. Feb. 26, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
Sat. Feb. 27, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
Sun. Feb. 28, 2016, 2:00pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
Wed. Mar. 2, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
Thurs. Mar. 3, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
Fri. Mar. 4, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
Sat. Mar. 5, 2016, 2:00pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
Sat. Mar. 5, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
Baltimore by Kirsten Greenidge is a contemporary story about the loss of innocence and the coming of age of a student forced to encounter the social ramifications of difference and her own cultural relevance.

UMD School of Music: UMD Symphony Orchestra
Alternative Energy
Fri. Feb. 26, 2016, 8:00pm, The Clarice, Dekelboum Concert Hall
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
New violin faculty artist Irina Muresanu and viola faculty artist Katherine Murdock are soloists in Mozart’s brilliant double concerto. With hip-hop and techno beats, folksy fiddling and junkyard percussion, Mason Bates’ Alternative Energy is a time-travelling montage that conveys the rise and fall of our industrialized world.

Professional Use of Social Media Workshop
Mon. Feb. 29, 2015, 4:00-5:00pm; University Career Center, 3100 Hornbake Library, South Wing)
Free, Registration Required
Did you know that many internships and entry-level jobs look for candidates with professional-level knowledge of social media? Pick up valuable skills for your resume during this workshop, which will provide background on how to run social media platforms as part of an internship or job. Open to all undergraduate and graduate students, as well as alumni. Please RSVP herehttp://go.umd.edu/arhusocm or email Kate Juhl at kjuhl@umd.edu.

Art In a Box: Campus-wide Art Design Contest
Deadline for submissions: March 1, 2016
Participants will have a chance to design a box for art therapy kits that creatively helps children cope with trauma. The kits will contain a collection of art and play materials that will be shipped internationally to different schools and educational institutions, as well as refugee camps. Winners will receive $5,000 in prize money.

Worldwise Arts & Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series
William “Bro” Adams and Jane Chu, In Conversation with Sheri Parks
Tues. March 22, 2016, 5:30pm; The Clarice, Gildenhorn Recital Hall
Free, ticket required
In celebration of their 50th anniversaries, Chairpersons of both the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts will join Sheri Parks in conversation about how the arts and humanities help shape our global future.

Artist Partner Program
NextLOOK: Yoko K.
Fri. March 25, 2016, 7:00pm; Joe’s Movement Emporium
Pay what you want, No tickets required
Electronic musician Yoko K. is a two-time winner of Wammie’s “Electronica Artist” and former Strathmore artist-in-residence who creates an immersive multimedia experience using live electronic music and video art. Her NextLOOK residency examines how post-apocalyptic views of the future shape our present and playfully explores an alternative. Audience members will be invited to participate and engage in a post-performance discussion and online forum about the non-immediate impact of the work.

Black Theatre Symposium
Saturday, April 2, 2016, 9:00am; Gildenhorn Recital Hall
The theme of the third annual Black Theatre Symposium is “Embracing Inclusion and Diversity in American Theatre.” The 2016 Black Theatre Symposium (BTS) continues to champion efforts towards inclusion and diversity in American theatre, and will address the overriding theme: “Black Aesthetics:  Past, Present, and Future.” The event will feature keynote speaker Johnetta Boone, and will include panel discussions, workshops, and performances that address the following questions:

  • What is a “Black Theatre Aesthetic”?
  • Which institutions are successfully cultivating black theatre scholars and artists?
  • How do we facilitate inclusion and diversity in the technical and design aspects of the field?
  • Racial Battle Fatigue — How can theatre positively impact the current cultural climate and racial tensions?

Theatre professionals, scholars, and students will convene to discuss and take action around these questions in order to influence and expand practices of inclusion in the field of theatre.

PANEL: Careers in Music, Film & Entertainment
Mon. April 4, 2016, 5:00-6:00pm; University Career Center, 3100 Hornbake Library, South Wing)
Free, Registration Required
Interested in an internship or career in the music, film or entertainment industries? Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to connect with panelists who work in these fields. Panelists will be named closer to the date. Open to all undergraduate and graduate students as well as alumni. Please RSVP here http://go.umd.edu/pnlentertain or email Kate Juhl at kjuhl@umd.edu.

Artist Partner Program
Puppet Cinema: Salt of the Earth
Fri. April 8, 2016, 8:00pm; The Clarice, Kogod Theatre
Sat. April 9, 2016, 8:00pm; The Clarice, Kogod Theatre
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
Puppetry, miniature sets and multimedia create a dystopian world that explores freedom.

Artist Partner Program
Margaret Leng Tan: Film Screening and Conversation
Sorceress of the New Piano: The Artistry of Margaret Leng Tan

Mon. April 11, 2016, 7:00pm; The Clarice, Leah M. Smith Hall
Free, Registration Recommended
Documentary film about avant-garde pianist Margaret Leng Tan.

Artist Partner Program, Michelle Smith Performing Arts Library
Margaret Leng Tan, Piano
Cabinet of Curiosities

Tues. April 12, 2016, 8:00pm; The Clarice, Kogod Theatre
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
Avant-garde pianist and the world’s first toy piano virtuoso.

Artist Partner Program
NextLOOK: Swing
Fri. April 15, 2016, 7:00pm; Joe’s Movement Emporium
Pay what you want, No tickets required.
Swing is a performance-in-progress combining aerial choreography with community voices to create fresh, honest aerial movement integrated with the audience’s own stories.

UMD School of Music
Music in Mind: Paris 1920
Sun. April 17, 2016, 3:00pm; The Clarice, Gildenhorn Recital Hall
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
With works by Poulenc, Satie, Prokofiev, and Cole Porter, this Music in Mind concert captures the distinct essence of Paris in the 1920s.

Artist Partner Program
Tanya Tagaq: Indigenous Rights/Indigenous Oppression, Part 1
Public Conversation

Tues. April 19, 2016, 7:00pm; Stamp Student Union, Prince George’s Room
Free, Registration Recommended
Tanya Tagaq gives a talk about growing up in an indigenous environment and her path to music.

Artist Partner Program
Tanya Tagaq: Indigenous Rights/Indigenous Oppression, Part 2
Luncheon Symposium at the School of Public Policy

Wed. April 20, 2016, 12:15pm; Van Munching Hall, Atrium
Free, Registration Recommended
A conversation with Tanya Tagaq and other Native artists about infusing activism into their creative expression.

Artist Partner Program
ArtistTalk: Indigenous Rights/Indigenous Oppression, Part 3
A Conversation with Tanya Tagaq

Thurs. April 21, 2016, 5:30pm; The Clarice, Leah M. Smith Hall
Free, Registration Recommended
Inuit Canadian throat singer Tanya Tagaq talks about her activism around food justice and food sovereignty.

Artist Partner Program
Tanya Tagaq
In Concert with Nanook of the North

Sat. April 23, 2016, 8:00pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
Inuit Canadian throat singer and activist for indigenous cultures.

Artist Partner Program
Fatoumata Diawara
Thurs. April 28, 2016, 8:00pm; The Clarice, Kay Theatre
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
Malian singer-songwriter inspired by Wassoulou traditions, jazz, punk and funk.

NEW VISIONS/NEW VOICES 2016: International Playwrights’ Intensive
Friday, April 29, 2016, 7:30pm
Saturday, April 30, 2016, 10:00am-4:00pm
Free, tickets required
The University of Maryland partners with The Kennedy Center’s 25th anniversary New Visions/ New Voices festival. Playwrights and producers from South Africa, Korea and India collaborate with TDPS students on their plays written for young audiences around the globe. Readings of these new theatrical works will be held at UMD followed by an intensive development period at the John F. Kennedy Center with professional actors and directors. 

UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies
UMoves Undergraduate Dance Concert
Fri. May 6, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Dance Theatre
Sat. May 7, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Dance Theatre
Sun. May 8, 2016, 3:00pm; The Clarice, Dance Theatre
Sun. May 8, 2016, 7:30pm; The Clarice, Dance Theatre
$25 Public / $20 Next Level / $10 Student/Youth
Concert featuring the emerging talent of the next generation of dace artists including original works created and/or performed by undergraduate students majoring in dance and new works developed throughout the year by guest choreographers.

Thinkathon for Refugees
Spring 2016, TBD
The Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy held a think-and-do day of intellectual activism in the fall to discuss the state of the refugee crisis and possible solutions and best practices. Our speakers, Yasmine Taeb, Legislative Representative for Human Rights and Civil Liberties and Tyler Stoddard and Hiba Salih of the International Rescue Committee-Baltimore have offered to return to campus for another event. If you are interested in participating in a briefing this spring on the topic, please contact arhusynergy@umd.edu.

For additional opportunities at The Clarice “For Student Terps”:http://theclarice.umd.edu/for-student-terps

For the most up to date enrichment opportunities: http://go.umd.edu/enrichment

To submit a new opportunity email arhusynergy@umd.edu with relevant details.

 

 

 

Gildenhorn Recital Hall
Friday, December 04, 2015 - 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

Angélique Kidjo will discuss her world activism in and out of the media spotlight and her life — from Benin to Paris to Brooklyn.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Undergraduate