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3/6/15

College Park was officially chartered along Route 1 70 years ago. And as University of Maryland president Wallace Loh says, “When the city prospers, the university prospers, too.”

But Loh says the city hasn’t exactly been prospering of late. And much of that has to do with the development — or lack thereof — on Route 1.

“This university has grown dramatically over the past 25 years to become a Top 20 public research university,” he explains. “Its future growth, to the extent that it’s constrained, is not by internal factors but by the surrounding community.”

Whereas a generation ago, 30-35 percent of faculty, staff and students live in College Park, Loh points out that now it’s down to three percent. “Most commute to Montgomery County, Howard County, and D.C.,” he says.

He adds that “if you look at all the top ranked public research universities, they’re also in top ranked university towns. There is a synergy between the two. Therefore we can no longer think of the continuing rise of the University of Maryland independently of the community of which it is a part.”

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Westminster Hall, Baltimore, MD
Thursday, April 30, 2015 - 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM

A one-day think and do event that brings together scholars, professionals, social activists, foundations and more to address some of societies most pressing issues.

Multipurpose Room, Nyumburu
Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

American Moor is a one-man play that engages around themes of blackness and maleness in the context of a black male actor’s audition for the role of Othello.

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
Monday, April 06, 2015 - 7:30 PM

Anna Deavere Smith, an actress, playwright, professor, and 2012 National Humanities Medal winner, will deliver the 2015 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities.

Hoff Theater, The Stamp
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 7:00 PM

This Voices of Social Change Speaker Series will feature Michele Norris and Nina Totenberg of NPR.

Nyumburu Multipurpose Room
Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

The one-man play, entitled American Moor, engages around themes of blackness and maleness in the context of a black male actor’s audition for the role of Othello.

A total $34,000 awarded by the university to Jorge Bravo, assistant professor of classics in the College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU), will help fund efforts to continue archeological exploration of the ancient Greek port of Kenchreai.

Bravo will travel to Greece in the summer to conduct preliminary investigations in new areas of Kenchreai, the eastern port of ancient Corinth. The work is the first part of Bravo’s larger plan to seek permits from the Greek government for further excavation and to secure future grants.

Funding, which is being provided by the Division of Research, ARHU and the Department of Classics, will help to pay for soil coring and GIS modeling of the harbor. The university’s support will also help sustain a field school for undergraduate and graduate students to continue to explore ancient Greek culture, a program he helped develop with an earlier $5,000 seed grant from ARHU.

Bravo said that the coring work will help researchers define what the environment was like for the area’s settlers and how they interacted with it as it changed over time. A geophysical survey using ground-penetrating radar and other methods will also help give researchers an idea of what lies beneath the earth’s surface. Corinth was a thriving commercial area from as early as about 700 B.C. through the Roman Empire to around 500 A.D., but as Bravo explained, the port was forced to move during that time as the environment changed.

“The general suspicion is that it was a process of silting up of the harbor over time,” Bravo said.

Bravo co-directs the Kenchreai Excavations along with Joseph L. Rife, associate professor of classics and anthropology at Vanderbilt University.  The Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C. also supports the project.

Kenchreai was first explored by American archeologists in the 1960s.  Bravo said that he became interested in the site after collaborating with others who had also worked in the area. Funding will help build collaborations between the university’s departments of geography, anthropology, history, classics and others.

“It’s really building collaborations between the humanities and the other schools,” Bravo said.

In addition to the new seaside excavation work, he said, students attending the four-week field school will also have the opportunity to explore remains believed to have served as an ancient residence and warehouse, nearby Roman tombs and other sites and museums in the region.

For more information about the field school in Greece and how to apply, visit:  http://globalmaryland.umd.edu/offices/education-abroad/program/11005. 

Kay Theatre
Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

The DeVos Institute of Arts Management at the University of Maryland kicks off a new series of research-oriented explorations into the greatest issues of concern to the future of the arts.

Ulrich Recital Hall, Tawes Hall
Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 3:30 PM

Professor Caroline Winterer of Stanford University will explore why Americans have found the ancient world relevant to modern questions.

Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 5:00 PM to Saturday, February 14, 2015 - 4:00 PM

Come to a panel discussion with Nancy Beadall and David Alan Harris on youth and violence, as well as a free workshop.

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