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Orem Alumni Hall, Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center
Thursday, February 01, 2018 - 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

Join ARHU for the 2nd courageous conversation focused on 'The Historical' with famed author and activist Bobby Seale.

The Clarice Performing Arts Center, Faculty/Staff Lounge
Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

Award-winning slam poet and social justice activist Theo Wilson will be hosting a poetry and creative writing workshop.

MEDIA ALERT

Description: The first lecture in the “2017-18 Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias” features Theo Wilson, the award-winning slam poet and social justice advocate who skyrocketed to social media fame after posting beliefs about hate and bias. Wilson will discuss his experience as a black man who went undercover in alt-right social media communities.

Who: Theo Wilson is a founding member of the Denver Slam Nuba team, which won the National Poetry Slam in 2011. He is also the executive director of Shop Talk Live, an organization that hosts community dialogues in barbershops and beauty salons on issues affecting African-American communities. In 2015, Wilson went undercover online to better understand the ideologies and social-media algorithms that inform the alt-right.

What: Award-winning slam poet and social justice advocate Theo Wilson discusses his experience as a black man who went undercover in alt-right social media communities.

When: Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 5:30 PM

Where: Gildenhorn Recital Hall. Located at the base of the grand staircase off the main lobby of The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center.

3800 The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

8270 Alumni Drive

University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-1625

Why: This event is the first lecture in the “2017-18 Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias.” Future lecturers include Bobby Seale, founding chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party, and Mara Liasson, NPR political correspondent. This year’s speakers consider what it means to engage in courageous conversations that speak to the difficult issues of hate and bias across personal, political and historical frames. Each lecture is an opportunity for the campus and the UMD community to join together for provocative conversations about resisting these issues.

How: The event is free but tickets are required. Members of the press should contact Nicky Everette, Director of Marketing and Communications, to RSVP.

ABOUT THE SERIES:

The Arts & Humanities Dean's Lecture Series provides an opportunity for the college faculty, students and staff to join together with colleagues across campus for stimulating conversation about issues that cross our disciplines. Lectures and performances may address either enduring or emerging questions central to the arts and humanities, or questions arising from other disciplines to which the arts and humanities might speak. In addition to presenting a major public event, each lecturer interacts in smaller settings with faculty, graduate students and/or undergraduates.

 

The College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland announces the “2017-18 Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias.” Featuring Theo Wilson, Bobby Seale and Mara Liasson, this year’s speakers consider what it means to engage in courageous conversations that speak to the difficult issues of hate and bias across personal, political and historical frames. Each lecture is an opportunity for the campus and the UMD community to join together for provocative conversations about resisting these issues.

The Personal: Theo Wilson (@lucifury)

Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 5:30 p.m.

Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

Award-winning slam poet and social justice advocate who skyrocketed to social media fame after posting beliefs about hate and bias will discuss his experience as a black man who went undercover in alt-right social media communities.

The Historical: Bobby Seale (@BobbySealecom)

Thursday, February 1, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Orem Alumni Hall, Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center

Famed author and founding chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party will present “Resistance: From the Sixties to Trump,” which will be followed by a book signing and reception.

Co-sponsored by the Nathan and Jeanette Miller Center for Historical Studies and the Department of African American Studies at UMD. In partnership with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Political: Mara Liasson (@MaraLiasson)

Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

Award-winning journalist and NPR political correspondent with over 30 years of experience reporting on the White House and Congress will present “The Political Landscape: Dealing with Hate and Bias in Washington.”

In collaboration with the Philip Merrill College of Journalism.

For free tickets or more information call 301.405.ARTS.

The Arts & Humanities Dean's Lecture Series provides an opportunity for the college faculty, students and staff to join together with colleagues across campus for stimulating conversation about issues that cross our disciplines. Lectures and performances may address either enduring or emerging questions central to the arts and humanities, or questions arising from other disciplines to which the arts and humanities might speak. In addition to presenting a major public event, each lecturer interacts in smaller settings with faculty, graduate students and/or undergraduates. 

Images: 

1. Theo Wilson: Photo by Woody Roseland via Westword

2. Bobby Seale: Photo by Carlos Avila Gonzalez via The Chronicle

3. Mara Liasson, Photo by New Hampshire Public Radio via WBAA.org

 

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Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

Join ARHU for the first DLS courageous conversation on 'The Personal' with slam poet and social justice advocate Theo Wilson.

0301 Hornbake Library, MITH Conference Room
Thursday, April 06, 2017 - 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM

Join this narrative of how blackness shapes the experiences of space and place across time.

Tawes Hall 0330
Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Reflect on how scholars use newly acquired approaches to cultivate and refine their empirical orientation.

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Theorizing “The Archive” explores one of the fundamental tools of black digital scholarship.

3/7/17

By Tom Hall & Bridget Armstrong | Midday on WYPR

"The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities are two of 17 federal agencies that appear to be targeted by the Trump administration for elimination, as its budget inclinations lean heavily toward defense spending. The state of Maryland funded arts institutions at the highest level ever last year, and the Governor has proposed an additional $1 million this year, bringing the allocation for the arts to $21 million in Fiscal Year 2018. Ironically, Baltimore City Schools are facing drastic cuts. Principals looking to trim expenses, may have to make cuts to music and visual arts programs. 

"An organization called Arts Every Day is holding a symposium this weekend that will call attention to the role that arts education plays in boosting attendance, improving test scores and making schools vibrant parts of their communities.

"Tom and Dr. Sheri Parks speak with arts educators and advocates about what the arts can do for kids and their families. They also talk about the cost of funding arts programs and if that cost is worth it when belts are being tightened locally and nationally."

Listen to the complete podcast: Midday on WYPR

1/26/17

By Christine Condon and Danielle Ohl | The Diamondback

"President Trump plans to defund the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, a move that could jeopardize funding for the arts and humanities at the University of Maryland and in this state.

"A Jan. 19 report in The Hill detailed a meeting between White House staff and Trump's transition team, who fleshed out a plan to cut back on bureaucracy and government spending. The plan included eliminating the two endowments, which have granted this university about $2.5 million for research, performances and projects since 2010.

" '[The NEH and NEA] have been important in a lot of ways,' said arts and humanities college Dean Bonnie Dill. 'They are a very important part of the work that we do.' "

Read the complete story online at The Diamondback.

Image: The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. (File photo/The Diamondback).

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