Home >> News Category >> Announcements

Announcements

Below please find undergraduate reserach opportunities from ARHU faculty posted in the Maryland Student Researchers database for Spring 2019. 

 

 

University of Maryland (UMD) 2019 Disability Summit
Looking Ahead - ADA turns 30
Friday April 5th, 2019
College Park Marriott and Hotel Conference Center

 

 

 

                                                                                      Call for Proposals
The UMD Disability Summit was established in 2016 as a forum for professionals, educators, academics, services providers, and advocates focusing on disability issues to dialogue and collaborate across types of disability and institution. The goal of the summit is to bring focus to and promote discussion of key current events and research impacting disability in society.

This 3rd Biennial Summit will take place on Friday April 5th, 2019 at the University of Maryland, College Park campus. The Keynote speaker will be Dr. Jonathan Lazar, Professor of Computer and Information Sciences at Towson University. Dr. Lazar is the founder and former director of the Universal Usability Laboratory (2003 to 2014). He researches and teaches on human-computer interaction, specifically, Web usability, Web accessibility for people with disabilities, user-centered design, assistive technology, and public policy.

The inaugural Summit, Activism and Advocacy in the Academy, took place in 2016, with Dr. Gregg Vanderheiden as the keynote speaker. In 2017, Dr. Beth Douthirt-Cohen took the stage to discuss “Moving from Pity and Fear to Solidarity and Justice,” and the Summit focused on Disability in a Polarized Nation. This year’s focus, Looking Ahead - the ADA turns 30, encourages presentations looking at the federal policy’s lifespan, and reflecting on the potential and pitfalls of advocacy and activism in the current moment.

We encourage submissions from academics, advocates, and members of the community covering a wide variety of topics including, but not limited to:

-       The history and outlook for the Americans with Disabilities Act
-       Disability Activism/Disability Justice (past, present and future)
-       Assistive Technologies
-       Accessible Labor Practices
-       Race, Gender, Class and Intersectional Approaches to Disability Advocacy
-       Disability Community Engagement, Advocacy and Action
-       Disability in the Media (the potential and pitfalls of representation)
-       Literature and Disability Studies
-       Attitudes and their Effect on Disability Policy
-       Critical Disability Studies

We are accepting proposals for:
-       Lecture-style Presentation (30 or 45 minutes)- Lecture-style presentations can range from in-depth scientific research to academic scholarly practices. Lectures include a Q&A portion.

-       Workshop (45 or 90 minutes)- Session focused on skill building or formal professional workforce training

-       Experience (45 or 90 minutes)- Session including live action, interactive, or hands-on components that engages session participants.

-       Panel Presentation (45 or 90 minutes)-  Three or more topic area presenters offer their perspective on a proposed disability studies topic. Each panel member will have the opportunity to provide an overview of their work followed by moderated questions and questions from the audience.

-       Poster Presentation (1 hour)- Open, gallery-style presentation where attendees will walk by presenters’ posters and discuss the scholarly information, best practices, initiatives, or works in progress that are being presented.

-       Other –  Additional types of presentations welcome! Share your idea.

Please submit a 200 word abstract, title, your preferred format, and your contact information email directly to disabilitysummit@umd.edu with the subject line, “Disability Summit Proposal”

Due date for proposal submissions is February 15, 2019.

If you have questions about abstract or proposal submission, please contact Mollie Greenberg or Stephanie Cork at disabilitysummit@umd.edu

For more information and updates check out our website: https://www.lib.umd.edu/disability-summit 

#DisabilityUMD #2019DisabilitySummit  

The College of Arts and Humanities is a co-sponsor for this event.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author addresses complexities of refugee experience on Tuesday.

By Maryland Today Staff | Maryland Today

"Refugees who come to new lands for safety and greater opportunity can encounter different kinds of hardship as well—racism from the majority population, identity crises, family rifts.

"Pulitzer Prize-winning fiction author Viet Thanh Nguyen, who fled his native Vietnam as a child, will discuss the dilemmas of displacement at 5:30 p.m. today at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center as part of the Arts & Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series. The lecture is also a component of UMD’s Year of Immigration, which seeks to foster a more inclusive and diverse community and increase awareness about immigration, global migration and refugees.

"Nguyen’s 2017 short story collection, “The Refugees,” was named the 2018-19 First Year Book by the Office of Undergraduate Studies. It’s being integrated into courses across disciplines and used as the centerpiece for discussion."

Read the complete article in Maryland Today

Image via Maryland Today

YEAR OF IM/MIGRATION: THEMED ACADEMIC YEAR FOR 2018-2019

In response to President Loh's call for initiatives that emphasize global citizenry, the College of Arts and Humanities is partnering with other campus units to create a themed year focused on issues pertaining to immigration, migration and refugees. A themed year on these critical areas will support several goals outlined in the University of Maryland's Strategic Plan:

  • help cultivate a more diverse, inclusive, and international culture at the heart of the university;
  • transform dialogue into doing good on a pressing social issue;
  • foster community engagement; and
  • make faculty, staff, and students better global citizens intent on improving the global common good.

ARHU, the Office of International Affairs, and ARHU's Center for Global Migration encourage broad participation from all academic units, centers, faculty, staff and students.  

LIMITED SUBMISSION MEMO

 

Subject:           NEH Summer Stipends

Sponsor:         National Endowment for the Humanities

Internal UMD deadline:   September 14, 2018

Sponsor Deadline:  September 26, 2018

Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Eligible projects usually result in articles, monographs, books, digital materials and publications, archaeological site reports, translations, or editions. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

Award Information: Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year.

Further information about the program and the submission process is available on the National Endowment for the Humanities site at: https://www.neh.gov/grants/research/summer-stipends.

Campus Nomination Process

The NEH Summer Stipends program allows two (2) nominees per institution. A three-page, single-spaced narrative and a two-page resume must be submitted through the VPR’s InfoReady Limited Submission portal by 5pm on Friday, September 14, 2018 (see below for detailed submission instructions). Campus nominees will be notified no later than Monday, September 24, 2018. The final submission deadline is Wednesday, September 26, 2018.

All materials submitted for consideration for a campus nomination must follow the NEH guidelines found at the link noted above. Materials that do not conform to the published guidelines will not be considered.

Questions regarding the application process or guidelines may be directed to Linda Aldoory, laldoory@umd.edu. TEL: 301-405-7364.

How to Apply through InfoReady

  1. Go to:   https://umd.infoready4.com/ .
  2. Use the “Log In” feature in the top right hand corner of the red heading banner to create a profile on the system.
  3. Use the blue “University of Maryland Login” button to activate your profile using your UMD directory credentials.
  4. Navigate to the “home” page on InfoReady. On the home page, a table is shown listing all the currently open competitions.
  5. Find the NEH Summer Stipend competition – click on the title to access.
  6. After reviewing all the information and guidelines for the competition, find and click on “Submit Application.”
  7. Follow the detailed instructions on how to apply and what materials to submit. Please note that materials are to be uploaded in one PDF only.

 

Conference:
Jerrold Levinson - PHIL
The Philosophy of Portraits: An International Conference, 4/12/2018

Edlie Wong - ENGL
Genealogies and Futures of Black Aesthetics, A Symposium in Honor of Distinguished University Professor of English, Mary Helen Washington, 4/25/2019

Lee Konstantinou - ENGL
ASAP/11: Annual Conference of ASAP: The Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present, 10/24/2019

New Directions Microgrants:
Sheri Parks - AMST
Stephanie Sapienza - MITH
Elisa Gironzetti - SLLC/SPAP

Subvention:
Jessica Enoch - ENGL

Tier I Seed Grant (College Level Endorsement):
Lindsey Anderson - COMM
Lisa Nathans - TDPS
Hayim Lapin - HIST
Kang Namkoong - COMM
Ashwini Tambe - WMST
 

Previous DRIF Award recipients can be found here.

 

Associate professor Sahar Khamis has co-edited Arab Women's Activism and Socio-Political Transformation: Unfinished Gender Revolutions, published by Palgrave/Macmillan and with co-editor Amel Mili (University of Pennsylvania). This book illustrates how Arab women have been engaging in three ongoing, parallel struggles, before, during, and after the Arab Spring, on three levels, namely: the political struggle to pave the road for democracy, freedom, and reform; the social struggle to achieve gender equality and fight all forms of injustice and discrimination against women; and the legal struggle to chart new laws which can safeguard both the political and the social gains. The contributors argue that while the political upheavals were oftentimes more prevalent and visible, they should not overshadow the parallel social and legal revolutions which are equally important, due to their long-term impacts on the region. The chapters shed light on the intersections, overlaps and divergences between these simultaneous, continuous gendered struggles and unpacks their complexities and multiple implications, locally, regionally, and internationally, across different countries and through different phases.

 

Department of Communication Professor Xiaoli Nan is the Principal Investigator on a $2.2 Million five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Entitled "Framing HPV Vaccination Messages for African American Parents," this grant is a collaborative effort, involving researchers from Maryland's School of Public Health and from UMB's School of Medicine--Nan's co-investigators include Cheryl Holt, School of Public Health, UMCP; Min Qi Wang, School of Public Health, UMCP' Shana Ntiri, School of Medicine, UMB; and Clement Adebamowo, School of Medicine, UMB.

Project Description: The 2014 President’s Cancer Panel called underuse of HPV vaccines “a serious, but correctable threat to progress against cancer.” The Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel, more recently, identified expanding the use of HPV vaccines as a top priority for cancer prevention, especially in medically underserved populations. Effective communication is crucial to widespread adoption of preventive measures against cancer like the HPV vaccines. Built upon recent advances in communication and behavioral sciences, the proposed project seeks to to develop and evaluate a novel, theory-based message framing intervention to accelerate HPV vaccine uptake among African American adolescents. This project aims to 1) develop culturally appropriate messages framed in gains and losses and pretest these messages through community engagement; 2) determine whether/how the effects of message framing (gain vs. loss) on African American parents’ acceptance of the HPV vaccine are moderated by their prior beliefs about HPV and the HPV vaccine; and 3) evaluate the efficacy of a message framing intervention rooted in message targeting principles through a clinic-based randomized trial. Addressing a critical aspect of health disparities disadvantaging the African American community, this research represents a systematic and timely effort to address the national urgency of optimizing communication strategies for promoting HPV vaccination among key stakeholders.

See Awards Your Colleagues Have Won
Congratulations to ARHU Faculty! 

May 2018 Update:

February 2018 Update:

Description: The second lecture in the “2017-18 Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias” features Bobby Seale, the founding chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party. Seale will present “Resistance: From the Sixties to Trump,” which will be followed by a book signing and reception. This event is co-sponsored by the Nathan and Jeanette Miller Center for Historical Studies and the Department of African American Studies, in partnership with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Who: Bobby Seale is the founding co-chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party, a revolutionary civil and human rights organization active in the United States from 1966-1982. Seale is the author of several books, including “Seize the Time: The Story of the Black Panther Party and Huey P. Newton” and “A Lonely Rage: The Autobiography of Bobby Seale.” His most recent book is “Power to the People: The World of the Black Panthers”

What: The famed civil and human rights activist Bobby Seale discusses the history of civil rights resistance from the 1960s to our present moment. A book signing of his most recent book, “Power to the People: The World of the Black Panthers,” will follow the lecture.

When: Thursday, February 1, 2018, 5:30 PM

Where: Orem Alumni Hall, Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center. 7801 Alumni Dr, College Park, MD 20742

Why: This event is the second lecture in the “2017-18 Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias.” The first lecture featured poet and social justice activist Theo Wilson, and the third lecture will feature Mara Liasson, NPR political correspondent. This year’s speakers consider what it means to engage in courageous conversations that speak to the difficult issues of hate and bias across personal, political and historical frames. Each lecture is an opportunity for the campus and the UMD community to join together for provocative conversations about resisting these issues.

How: The event is free but an RSVP is recommended. Members of the press should contact K. Lorraine Graham, Communications Manager, to RSVP.

ABOUT THE SERIES:

The Arts & Humanities Dean's Lecture Series provides an opportunity for the college faculty, students and staff to join together with colleagues across campus for stimulating conversation about issues that cross our disciplines. Lectures and performances may address either enduring or emerging questions central to the arts and humanities, or questions arising from other disciplines to which the arts and humanities might speak. In addition to presenting a major public event, each lecturer interacts in smaller settings with faculty, graduate students and/or undergraduates.

The College of Arts and Humanities extends its congratulations to outstanding faculty who have been named 2017-18 recipients of the Creative and Performing Arts Awards (CAPAA) or Research and Scholarship Awards (RASA) from the University of Maryland’s Graduate School.

ABOUT CAPAA:

CAPPA supports artistic activities and are awarded to full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty. Faculty who receive a semester award are excused from teaching duties during the period for which the CAPAA was granted. Those who receive a summer CAPAA will receive a $9,000 stipend for two months during the summer for which the award is granted. To be eligible for the summer award, the faculty member needs to hold a 9 – 9 ½ appointment, which means they do not have teaching responsibilities over the summer. The most recent CAPAA summer awardees will apply the award to summer 2017.

ARHU’s semester CAPAA recipients include:

Joshua Weiner, Department of English

Helen Huang, School of Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies

 

ARHU’s summer CAPAA recipients include:

Cy Keener, Department of Art

Brandon Morse, Department of Art

Gabrielle Fuentes, Department of English

Sarah Frisof, School of Music

 

ABOUT RASA:

RASA are awarded to full-time tenure and tenure-track faculty. The awards support research and scholarship. Faculty who receive a semester award are excused from teaching duties during the period for which the RASA was granted. Faculty who receive a summer RASA will receive a $9,000 stipend for two months during the summer for which the award is granted. To be eligible for the summer award, the faculty member needs to hold a 9 – 9 ½ appointment, which means they do not have teaching responsibilities over the summer. The most recent RASA summer awardees will apply the award to summer 2017.

ARHU semester RASA Recipients:

Andrew Schonebaum, School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Alexis Lothian, Department of Women's Studies

Ali Abasi, School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Damien Pfister, Department of Communication

Randy Ontiveros, Department of English

Janelle Wong, Department of American Studies

Jan Padios, Department of American Studies

ARHU summer RASA Recipients:

Antoine Borrut, Department of History

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Announcements