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ARHU Graduate Student Travel Awards 2017-2018 

 

To support the professional development of its graduate students through the presentation of original research, the College of Arts and Humanities awards travel monies to significant national and international conferences. There will be three competitions per year with approximately nine awards given in each competition. 

 

Eligible expenses include transportation, lodging, registration fees and per diem for food. 

 

General Guidelines: 

Up to $500 for travel within North America and $700 for international travel. 

 

Priority will be given to students attending national or international conferences of major professional organizations. ARHU particularly seeks to help students toward the end of their graduate careers gain experience and make contacts important to their intellectual and professional development and to their job prospects. However, the Fellowship Committee will hold aside a certain amount of funding for students presenting original work at prestigious conferences early in their careers (e.g., before advancing to candidacy). 

 

Preference will be given to students who have not had an ARHU Travel Award in the past, unless it was an early career award. Awards will not be given for travel that has already taken place. 

 

These applications must be entered on time into the online system to be considered for the current cycle. The online application system will close at midnight on each of the three deadline dates below. 

 

College deadlines (for students and departments to submit materials online):

  • Round 1: Monday, October 2, 2017 (for travel taking place between October 1, 2017 and December 3, 2017) 
  • Round 2: Monday, December 4, 2017 (for travel taking place between December 4, 2017 to May 6, 2018) 
  • Round 3: Monday, May 7, 2018 (for travel taking place between May 7, 2018 to September 30, 2018) 

Please check with the individual program graduate director about departmental deadlines. 

 

The application process for Travel Awards is entirely online. No paper applications will be accepted. 

 

The application process is easy: 

Students should go to http://apply.arhu.umd.edu and click on Travel Awards, provide all the supporting information, and submit the application. (Students can work on an application, save, and come back to the site as well, so they don’t have to do everything at once). 

 

The supporting information requested is as follows: 

• Short CV (including up-to-date contact information and address)

• Letter of application including:

  • Stage of graduate career (e.g., defending dissertation in Fall 2016)
  • Brief description (no more than two paragraphs) of the research to be presented, its significance in the field, and the format of the presentation (e.g. paper on a panel, poster presentation). Please keep in mind that the research should be contextualized for non-specialists.
  • Brief description of the conference and its organizing body, including the url of the conference/organization website. Include a statement of the review process for the accepted research.
  • Statement of the contribution the conference will make to your career.
  • Statement of whether application has been made for this trip to other funding sources (e.g. Goldhaber Travel Awards from the Graduate School).  Students are encouraged to apply for outside funding.
  • Budget of estimated costs
  • Copy of the letter/email accepting/inviting the presentation

If you encounter any technical problems using the online system, please contact Megan Weng.  https://apply.arhu.umd.edu/contact

 

If you have questions about the Travel Awards themselves, or if your students have questions, please contact Trevor Parry-Giles, 301-641-0019 or tpg@umd.edu

 

The College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland announces the “2017-18 Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias.” Featuring Theo Wilson, Bobby Seale and Mara Liasson, this year’s speakers consider what it means to engage in courageous conversations that speak to the difficult issues of hate and bias across personal, political and historical frames. Each lecture is an opportunity for the campus and the UMD community to join together for provocative conversations about resisting these issues.

The Personal: Theo Wilson (@lucifury)

Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 5:30 p.m.

Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

Award-winning slam poet and social justice advocate who skyrocketed to social media fame after posting beliefs about hate and bias will discuss his experience as a black man who went undercover in alt-right social media communities.

The Historical: Bobby Seale (@BobbySealecom)

Thursday, February 1, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Orem Alumni Hall, Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center

Famed author and founding chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party will present “Resistance: From the Sixties to Trump,” which will be followed by a book signing and reception.

Co-sponsored by the Nathan and Jeanette Miller Center for Historical Studies and the Department of African American Studies at UMD. In partnership with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Political: Mara Liasson (@MaraLiasson)

Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

Award-winning journalist and NPR political correspondent with over 30 years of experience reporting on the White House and Congress will present “The Political Landscape: Dealing with Hate and Bias in Washington.”

In collaboration with the Philip Merrill College of Journalism.

For free tickets or more information call 301.405.ARTS.

The Arts & Humanities Dean's Lecture Series provides an opportunity for the college faculty, students and staff to join together with colleagues across campus for stimulating conversation about issues that cross our disciplines. Lectures and performances may address either enduring or emerging questions central to the arts and humanities, or questions arising from other disciplines to which the arts and humanities might speak. In addition to presenting a major public event, each lecturer interacts in smaller settings with faculty, graduate students and/or undergraduates. 

Images: 

1. Theo Wilson: Photo by Woody Roseland via Westword

2. Bobby Seale: Photo by Carlos Avila Gonzalez via The Chronicle

3. Mara Liasson, Photo by New Hampshire Public Radio via WBAA.org

 

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The purpose of the Research Advisory Comittee is to create a channel for faculty voice on the research agenda and efforts of the college. The college is seeking guidance from faculty who are committed to excellence in their field's areas of scholarship and other intellectual pursuits. The Research Committee will consist of the Associate Dean for Research and Programming, and a representative from various ARHU academic units and centers. 

 2017-18 Inaugural Members (alphabetical order):

  • Christopher Bonner (HIST)
  • Jorge Bravo (CLAS)
  • David Ellis (NFLC)
  • Ken Elpus (MUSC)
  • Maxine Grossman (JWST)
  • Frank Hildy (TDPS)
  • Curlee Raven Holton (Driskell Center)
  • Maura Keefe (TDPS)
  • Fatemeh Keshavarz (SLLC)
  • Trevor Munoz (MITH)
  • Irina Muresanu (MUSC)
  • Zita Nunes (ENGL)
  • Colin Phillips (LING)
  • Damien Pfister (COMM)
  • Joshua Shannon (ARTH)
  • Rachel Singpurwalla (PHIL)
  • Janelle Wong (AMST)
  • Liese Zahabi (ARTT)
  • Ruth Zambrana (WMST/CRGE)

 

ARHU Graduate Student Travel Awards 2017-2018 

 

To support the professional development of its graduate students through the presentation of original research, the College of Arts and Humanities awards travel monies to significant national and international conferences. There will be three competitions per year with approximately nine awards given in each competition. 

 

Eligible expenses include transportation, lodging, registration fees and per diem for food. 

 

General Guidelines: 

Up to $500 for travel within North America and $700 for international travel. 

 

Priority will be given to students attending national or international conferences of major professional organizations. ARHU particularly seeks to help students toward the end of their graduate careers gain experience and make contacts important to their intellectual and professional development and to their job prospects. However, the Fellowship Committee will hold aside a certain amount of funding for students presenting original work at prestigious conferences early in their careers (e.g., before advancing to candidacy). 

 

Preference will be given to students who have not had an ARHU Travel Award in the past, unless it was an early career award. Awards will not be given for travel that has already taken place. 

 

These applications must be entered on time into the online system to be considered for the current cycle. The online application system will close at midnight on each of the three deadline dates below. 

 

College deadlines (for students and departments to submit materials online):

  • Round 1: Monday, October 2, 2017 (for travel taking place between October 1, 2017 and December 3, 2017) 
  • Round 2: Monday, December 4, 2017 (for travel taking place between December 4, 2017 to May 6, 2018) 
  • Round 3: Monday, May 7, 2018 (for travel taking place between May 7, 2018 to September 30, 2018) 

Please check with the individual program graduate director about departmental deadlines. 

 

The application process for Travel Awards is entirely online. No paper applications will be accepted. 

 

The application process is easy: 

Students should go to http://apply.arhu.umd.edu and click on Travel Awards, provide all the supporting information, and submit the application. (Students can work on an application, save, and come back to the site as well, so they don’t have to do everything at once). 

 

The supporting information requested is as follows: 

• Short CV (including up-to-date contact information and address)

• Letter of application including:

  • Stage of graduate career (e.g., defending dissertation in Fall 2016)
  • Brief description (no more than two paragraphs) of the research to be presented, its significance in the field, and the format of the presentation (e.g. paper on a panel, poster presentation). Please keep in mind that the research should be contextualized for non-specialists.
  • Brief description of the conference and its organizing body, including the url of the conference/organization website. Include a statement of the review process for the accepted research.
  • Statement of the contribution the conference will make to your career.
  • Statement of whether application has been made for this trip to other funding sources (e.g. Goldhaber Travel Awards from the Graduate School).  Students are encouraged to apply for outside funding.
  • Budget of estimated costs
  • Copy of the letter/email accepting/inviting the presentation

If you encounter any technical problems using the online system, please contact Megan Weng.  https://apply.arhu.umd.edu/contact

 

If you have questions about the Travel Awards themselves, or if your students have questions, please contact Trevor Parry-Giles, 301-641-0019 or tpg@umd.edu

 

The Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy will start accepting accepting DRIF proposals for the 2017-18 academic year Monday, September 18, 2017. Please see the Call for DRIF Proposals for more information.

Tenure-Track and Professional-Track Faculty are eligible to apply.  We offer three different funding categories that are in keeping with the Center for Synergy’s interdisciplinary and engaged research goals. A limited amount of subvention funds is also available for the reproduction of images for book publication. In addition, we offer funding in support of applications to the Division of Research Faculty Incentive Program Tier I Seed Grants. The vast majority of conference grants are awarded in the fall. There is only a small amount awarded for conference proposals in the spring cycle. Conference proposals should only be submitted in the spring cycle if the timelines of the conference requires you to apply then. New Directions Innovation Seed Grants are only awarded in the fall.  

Funded initiatives will be those that promise to promote interdisciplinary research and scholarship and/or enhance links to and engagement in the community beyond the campus. Due to budget constraints, priority will be given to requests from units that are not currently receiving operational funding from the Dean’s office. 

To submit a proposal, please log-on with your UMD directory ID and password to the College of Arts and Humanities Online Applications System which can be found at https://apply.arhu.umd.edu. There you can select the appropriate application and fill in the fields, upload your project description and submit when complete. You can save a draft of your application to submit at a later time, if necessary. Only one submission can be accepted per person per application so please make sure all applications are complete and fit the call before submitting. All applications for the fall cycle must be submitted electronically by 5 pm on Friday, October 13, 2017. 

We encourage everyone to apply! If you have any questions, please contact Linda Aldoory, Associate Dean for Research and Programming, at laldoory@umd.edu

 

To: Colleagues
From: Bonnie Thornton Dill, Dean
Date: July 20, 2017
Re: Associate Dean Appointments

Dear Colleagues:

I'm pleased to announce the appointments of Linda Aldoory and Ralph Bauer to Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Humanities.

Linda Aldoory, Professor of Communication, will serve as the Associate Dean for Research and Programming, effective July 1. She will work to support research and scholarly productivity of the college’s faculty and graduate students by enhancing opportunities for sponsored research, fellowships, partnerships and awards. She will lead the Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy and develop programming that promotes the distinctive mission of the college across the university, in the community and nationally. Working closely with students, faculty, staff, administrators, the Office of the Vice President for Research and external partners, Aldoory will develop a plan to illuminate the work of the arts and humanities, particularly scholarship of diverse, interdisciplinary and collaborative nature.

Aldoory joined the faculty at UMD in 1999 as Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication. In 2005 she was promoted to Associate Professor and later, from 2011-2015, was appointed Associate Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health where she served as Endowed Chair and Director of UMD’s Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy. She returned to the Department of Communication in 2015, most recently serving as Associate Chair and Co-Director of Graduate Studies. Aldoory’s promotion to Professor is effective August 2017. She has served on numerous committees and advisory boards, including departmental faculty and teaching committees, Collegiate Council and UMD’s Future of Information Alliance Advisory Board.

Her research explores the field of health communication, specifically public health campaigns and message design and their effects on underserved populations. She has published an edited book and has authored more than 40 articles, book chapters and encyclopedia entries. She has been awarded a commissioned paper by the National Academies of Science and has been the Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator on several extramural grants and contracts.

Aldoory holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from The George Washington University, a master’s degree in journalism from University of Texas at Austin and a doctoral degree in mass communication from Syracuse University.

Ralph Bauer, Associate Professor of English, will serve as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, effective August 15. He will oversee undergraduate and graduate curriculum, courses, programs and enrollments; graduate student recruitment, fellowships and advisory board; ARHU’s five living-learning programs and the Learning Outcomes Assessment (LOA) process. He will spearhead efforts to highlight the knowledge and skills acquired in arts and humanities based learning, and help develop pathways for majors who want to combine their learning with the sciences or other disciplines, in and outside of the college. Working closely with students, faculty, staff and administrators, particularly the Office of Undergraduate Studies and The Graduate School, Bauer will provide leadership and support that facilitates forward-looking, cutting-edge and diversity-infused education in the arts and humanities.  

Since his arrival at UMD in 1998, Bauer has served as Director of Graduate Studies and Director of Honors in the Department of English. He has also served on college and university committees, including the ARHU Committee on Programs, Courses and Curricula (PCC); the UMD Graduate Council Working Group for Teaching Assistant Training and Mentoring; and the 2017 Middle States Accreditation Review Committee.

Bauer’s research explores the literatures and cultures of the Colonial Americas from a hemispheric perspective, with special focus on the history of science and Native American Studies. He is editor of the Early Americas Digital Archive and author of "The Cultural Geography of Colonial American Literatures: Empire, Travel, Modernity" (Cambridge University Press, 2003 and 2008); "Creole Subjects in the Colonial Americas: Empires, Texts, Identities" (University of North Carolina Press, 2009); and “The Alchemy of Conquest: Science, Religion, and the Secrets of the New World” (forthcoming, University of Virginia Press); among others.

He was previously awarded Outstanding Director of Graduate Studies by UMD’s Graduate School and a Colorado Endowment for the Humanities Publication Prize for his translation of “An Inca Account of the Conquest of Peru.”

Bauer earned his bachelor’s degrees in English, German and Spanish from University of Erlangen (Nuremberg, Germany) and master’s and doctoral degrees in American Studies from Michigan State University.  

I welcome these new administrators to the Dean’s Office and invite you to offer them congratulations on their respective appointments. I also wish to thank the outgoing Associate Deans Sheri Parks and Alene Moyer for their excellent leadership and service over the past five years.

I give special thanks to members of the search committee, chaired by Juan Uriagereka, Professor of Linguistics.

Baltimore Stories: Morrell Park: A Community Conversation Event
11/16/16 - 7:00 PM

The 4th Baltimore Stories Art of Transformation event: Morrell Park: A Community Conversation Event.

Baltimore Stories: Narrative 4 Story Exchange
11/15/16 - 7:00 PM

Baltimore Stories: Narrative 4 engages a group of Baltimore high school students and Baltimore first responders in a structured story exchange as a way to break down barriers and increase empathy.

1/30/17

ANNOUNCING THE SOCIETY FOR TEXTUAL SCHOLARSHIP’S 2017 CFP  

 

The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) and the Andrew W. Mellon-funded African American Digital Humanities Initiative (AADHum) invite your participation in “Textual Embodiments,” the Society for Textual Scholarship’s International Interdisciplinary Conference for 2017.

 

Date: Wednesday, May 31 - Friday, June 2, 2017

Location: University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland USA

Program Chairs: Neil Fraistat, Purdom Lindblad, Catherine Knight Steele, Raffaele Viglianti

Deadline for Proposals: February 26, 2017

Keynote speakers: Marisa Parham (Amherst University)

                       Susan Brown  (University of Guelph)

 

Our conference theme is "Textual Embodiments," broadly construed. With this theme we hope to engage a range of issues involving the materiality of texts, including their physical, virtual, or performative manifestations as objects that can decay or break down and can potentially be repaired and sustained over time. It also concerns the processes of inclusion and exclusion through which bodies of texts take shape in the form of editions, archives, collections, and exhibition building, as well as the ethical responsibilities faced by textual scholars, archivists, conservationists, media archeologists, digital resource creators, and cultural heritage professionals engaging in these processes.

 

As always, the conference is open to submissions involving interdisciplinary discussion of current research into particular aspects of textual work: the discovery, enumeration, description, bibliographical analysis, editing, annotation, mark-up, and sustainability of texts in disciplines such as cultural studies, literature, history, musicology, classical and biblical studies, philosophy, art history, legal history, history of science and technology, computer science, library and information science, archives, lexicography, epigraphy, paleography, codicology, cinema studies, new media studies, game studies, theater, linguistics, and textual and literary theory. Considerations of the role of computational methodologies, tools, and technologies in textual theory and practice are of course welcome, as are papers addressing aspects of archival theory and practice as they pertain to textual criticism and scholarly editing.

 

Especially welcome are interdisciplinary papers addressing the theme of Textual Embodiment in the fields of Black Diaspora Studies, Indigenous Studies, LGBTQ Studies, Latinx Studies, Disability Studies, Women’s Studies, and Critical Theory.

 

Submissions may take the following traditional forms:

1. Papers. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length, making a significant original contribution to scholarship. Papers that are primarily reports or demonstrations of tools or projects are discouraged.

2.    Panels. Panels may consist of either three associated papers or four to six roundtable speakers. Roundtables should address topics of broad interest and scope, with the goal of fostering lively debate with audience participation.

3.    Workshops. Workshops should propose a specific problem, tool, or skill set for which the workshop leader will provide expert guidance and instruction. Examples might be an introduction to forensic computing or paleography. Workshop proposals that are accepted will be announced on the conference Web site (http://www.textual.org) and attendees will be required to enroll with the workshop leader(s).

4. Submissions may also take the form of Open Fishbowl sessions. Drawing on the expertise of both speakers and attendees, Fishbowls are small group discussions in which 5 initial participants face one another in a circle, in the middle of the larger audience. Participants cycle out as audience members join the inner circle to create dialogue across perspectives and different types of research. Submitted proposals should include a brief statement as to the core idea or theme for the fishbowl, emphasizing its relation to conference themes or relevance to the larger Textual Studies community. Naming some or all of the initial five “fish” is encouraged. Potential topics for Fishbowl session might include, for example, “Minimal Computing, Globalized Editions,” “Participatory Editions,” and “#ArchivesSoWhite.”

 

Proposals for all formats should include a title; abstract (250 words max.) of the proposed paper, panel, seminar, or workshop; and name, email address, and institutional affiliation for all participants. Format should be clearly indicated. Seminar, fishbowl, and workshop proposals in particular should take care to articulate the imagined audience and any expectations of prior knowledge or preparation.

 

All abstracts should indicate what if any technological support will be required.

Inquiries and proposals should be submitted electronically to https://goo.gl/forms/B6xi4SmZAkmwWB9o2/. Responses will be sent by March 10.

 

The Center for Synergy in the College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU) has received a $100,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to fund “Home Stories,” a digital storytelling project that empowers migrant youth to create and share their stories with the wider public.

The award is part of NEH’s inaugural Humanities Access grants, which provide cultural programming to underserved groups and were awarded to 34 organizations. The grant is designed to encourage fundraising and sustainability of ongoing programming.

The project co-directors are Ana Patricia Rodríguez, associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese in the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures and Sheri Parks, associate dean of research, interdisciplinary scholarship and programming and associate professor of American studies.

The project responds to the growing number of often-unaccompanied migrant youth who travel to the U.S.-Mexico border and eventually seek to reunite with families, relatives or friends who live in the long-standing Central American communities near the University of Maryland. These newcomers navigate multiple identities but rarely have the opportunity to reflect on or share these experiences. Despite the scale of youth migration to this area, there is little research or ethnographic work generated about or by these youth.

“We are living in a historical moment where there is an explosion in migration,” says Rodríguez.  “Digital storytelling is a way of uncovering these stories and making them accessible to a wider public, and it is something that anyone can learn.”

“Home Stories” extends the Center for Synergy’s ongoing Social Innovation Scholars Program into the public humanities. Through the project, undergraduate students at the University of Maryland will enroll in a multi-semester course with Rodríguez to learn about the migrant experience while collaborating with migrant youth from local middle and high schools to explore digital storytelling.  Digital stories are multimedia movies that combine voiceovers, video, sound and text to create a narrative. Both in and out of the classroom, they are a tool for not only developing technical skills, but also promoting self-reflection and critical thinking.

“The project is a way of connecting students who have the technological skills with migrant youth in communities who have important stories to tell,” says Rodríguez.  “Digital storytelling is a democratizing tool that allows these stories to be created and shared across communities.”

The project will work with youth in local schools that enroll large numbers of recently arrived migrant youth from Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean and culminates in a community screening of the filmed stories these youth produce, which will then be available on a public website.

“The humanities help us study our past, understand our present, and prepare for our future,” says NEH Chairman William D. Adams. “The National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to support projects that will benefit all Americans and remind us of our shared human experience.”

 

Image Credit:
Close up of Child Migrant Quilt Project (September 2014)
© Ana Rosa Ventura-Molina 2014

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