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Research and Scholarly Work

LIMITED SUBMISSION MEMO

 

Subject:           NEH Summer Stipends

Sponsor:         National Endowment for the Humanities

Internal UMD deadline:   September 14, 2018

Sponsor Deadline:  September 26, 2018

Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Eligible projects usually result in articles, monographs, books, digital materials and publications, archaeological site reports, translations, or editions. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

Award Information: Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year.

Further information about the program and the submission process is available on the National Endowment for the Humanities site at: https://www.neh.gov/grants/research/summer-stipends.

Campus Nomination Process

The NEH Summer Stipends program allows two (2) nominees per institution. A three-page, single-spaced narrative and a two-page resume must be submitted through the VPR’s InfoReady Limited Submission portal by 5pm on Friday, September 14, 2018 (see below for detailed submission instructions). Campus nominees will be notified no later than Monday, September 24, 2018. The final submission deadline is Wednesday, September 26, 2018.

All materials submitted for consideration for a campus nomination must follow the NEH guidelines found at the link noted above. Materials that do not conform to the published guidelines will not be considered.

Questions regarding the application process, guidelines, or for a review of draft proposals may be directed to Cara Kennedy, ckenned3@umd.edu. TEL: 301-405-4698.

How to Apply through InfoReady

  1. Go to:   https://umd.infoready4.com/ .
  2. Use the “Log In” feature in the top right hand corner of the red heading banner to create a profile on the system.
  3. Use the blue “University of Maryland Login” button to activate your profile using your UMD directory credentials.
  4. Navigate to the “home” page on InfoReady. On the home page, a table is shown listing all the currently open competitions.
  5. Find the NEH Summer Stipend competition – click on the title to access.
  6. After reviewing all the information and guidelines for the competition, find and click on “Submit Application.”
  7. Follow the detailed instructions on how to apply and what materials to submit. Please note that materials are to be uploaded in one PDF only.

 

See Awards Your Colleagues Have Won
Congratulations to ARHU Faculty! 

May 2018 Update:

February 2018 Update:

The College of Arts and Humanities extends its congratulations to outstanding faculty who have been named 2017-18 recipients of the Creative and Performing Arts Awards (CAPAA) or Research and Scholarship Awards (RASA) from the University of Maryland’s Graduate School.

ABOUT CAPAA:

CAPPA supports artistic activities and are awarded to full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty. Faculty who receive a semester award are excused from teaching duties during the period for which the CAPAA was granted. Those who receive a summer CAPAA will receive a $9,000 stipend for two months during the summer for which the award is granted. To be eligible for the summer award, the faculty member needs to hold a 9 – 9 ½ appointment, which means they do not have teaching responsibilities over the summer. The most recent CAPAA summer awardees will apply the award to summer 2017.

ARHU’s semester CAPAA recipients include:

Joshua Weiner, Department of English

Helen Huang, School of Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies

 

ARHU’s summer CAPAA recipients include:

Cy Keener, Department of Art

Brandon Morse, Department of Art

Gabrielle Fuentes, Department of English

Sarah Frisof, School of Music

 

ABOUT RASA:

RASA are awarded to full-time tenure and tenure-track faculty. The awards support research and scholarship. Faculty who receive a semester award are excused from teaching duties during the period for which the RASA was granted. Faculty who receive a summer RASA will receive a $9,000 stipend for two months during the summer for which the award is granted. To be eligible for the summer award, the faculty member needs to hold a 9 – 9 ½ appointment, which means they do not have teaching responsibilities over the summer. The most recent RASA summer awardees will apply the award to summer 2017.

ARHU semester RASA Recipients:

Andrew Schonebaum, School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Alexis Lothian, Department of Women's Studies

Ali Abasi, School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Damien Pfister, Department of Communication

Randy Ontiveros, Department of English

Janelle Wong, Department of American Studies

Jan Padios, Department of American Studies

ARHU summer RASA Recipients:

Antoine Borrut, Department of History

 

5/29/17

By Michele Kennerly and Carly S. Woods | Eidolon

"Arms akimbo, Wonder Woman stands with one well-greaved leg in the ancient world and one in ours. The imminent release of the first full-length, live-action Wonder Woman film is an occasion for classical reception work that joins dynamic efforts already underway on the classics and comics and the classics and modern fantasy. The decades of interpretive enthusiasm Wonder Woman has inspired, however, make it difficult to put a new spin on things.

"So we stake our claim in the old: the story and history of Wonder Woman are suggestive of the ancient (yet enduring) habit of talking about influence, obedience, and persuasion through a gender-based idiom of power. Furthermore, the “persuasion dimension” of Wonder Woman continues to gain depth in popular and political culture, though it is not always recognized."

Read their complete article at Eidolon.

Image: Red-Figure Amphora depicting combat of Greeks against Amazons, attributed to the Suessula Painter (ca. 400 BCE). Via Eidolon.

 

3/30/17

By Mabinty Quarshie | USA Today

"When Bill O'Reilly insulted Rep. Maxine Water's hair and White House press secretary Sean Spicer told reporter April Ryan to "stop shaking your head," the comments by the two white men hit a nerve.

"Black women — who often face a one-two punch of racism and sexism in their daily lives — immediately took to social media using the hashtag #BlackWomenAtWork to air out their grievances, including those about other women.

" 'The things that black women need to push for are quite different than what we think of as the mainstream feminist movement,' said Sheri Parks, a professor of American studies at the University of Maryland and author of Fierce Angels: The Strong Black Woman in American Life and Culture."

Read the complete article at USA Today

3/7/17

By Tom Hall & Bridget Armstrong | Midday on WYPR

"The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities are two of 17 federal agencies that appear to be targeted by the Trump administration for elimination, as its budget inclinations lean heavily toward defense spending. The state of Maryland funded arts institutions at the highest level ever last year, and the Governor has proposed an additional $1 million this year, bringing the allocation for the arts to $21 million in Fiscal Year 2018. Ironically, Baltimore City Schools are facing drastic cuts. Principals looking to trim expenses, may have to make cuts to music and visual arts programs. 

"An organization called Arts Every Day is holding a symposium this weekend that will call attention to the role that arts education plays in boosting attendance, improving test scores and making schools vibrant parts of their communities.

"Tom and Dr. Sheri Parks speak with arts educators and advocates about what the arts can do for kids and their families. They also talk about the cost of funding arts programs and if that cost is worth it when belts are being tightened locally and nationally."

Listen to the complete podcast: Midday on WYPR

1/26/17

By Christine Condon and Danielle Ohl | The Diamondback

"President Trump plans to defund the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, a move that could jeopardize funding for the arts and humanities at the University of Maryland and in this state.

"A Jan. 19 report in The Hill detailed a meeting between White House staff and Trump's transition team, who fleshed out a plan to cut back on bureaucracy and government spending. The plan included eliminating the two endowments, which have granted this university about $2.5 million for research, performances and projects since 2010.

" '[The NEH and NEA] have been important in a lot of ways,' said arts and humanities college Dean Bonnie Dill. 'They are a very important part of the work that we do.' "

Read the complete story online at The Diamondback.

Image: The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. (File photo/The Diamondback).

1/19/17

By Dan Rodricks | Roughly Speaking Podcast

In this podcast, culture commentator Sheri Parks talks about the transition from Obama to Trump, and Friday’s inauguration.

Listen to the complete podcast online at Roughly Speaking.

The Center for Synergy in the College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU) has received a $100,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to fund “Home Stories,” a digital storytelling project that empowers migrant youth to create and share their stories with the wider public.

The award is part of NEH’s inaugural Humanities Access grants, which provide cultural programming to underserved groups and were awarded to 34 organizations. The grant is designed to encourage fundraising and sustainability of ongoing programming.

The project co-directors are Ana Patricia Rodríguez, associate professor of Spanish and Portuguese in the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures and Sheri Parks, associate dean of research, interdisciplinary scholarship and programming and associate professor of American studies.

The project responds to the growing number of often-unaccompanied migrant youth who travel to the U.S.-Mexico border and eventually seek to reunite with families, relatives or friends who live in the long-standing Central American communities near the University of Maryland. These newcomers navigate multiple identities but rarely have the opportunity to reflect on or share these experiences. Despite the scale of youth migration to this area, there is little research or ethnographic work generated about or by these youth.

“We are living in a historical moment where there is an explosion in migration,” says Rodríguez.  “Digital storytelling is a way of uncovering these stories and making them accessible to a wider public, and it is something that anyone can learn.”

“Home Stories” extends the Center for Synergy’s ongoing Social Innovation Scholars Program into the public humanities. Through the project, undergraduate students at the University of Maryland will enroll in a multi-semester course with Rodríguez to learn about the migrant experience while collaborating with migrant youth from local middle and high schools to explore digital storytelling.  Digital stories are multimedia movies that combine voiceovers, video, sound and text to create a narrative. Both in and out of the classroom, they are a tool for not only developing technical skills, but also promoting self-reflection and critical thinking.

“The project is a way of connecting students who have the technological skills with migrant youth in communities who have important stories to tell,” says Rodríguez.  “Digital storytelling is a democratizing tool that allows these stories to be created and shared across communities.”

The project will work with youth in local schools that enroll large numbers of recently arrived migrant youth from Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean and culminates in a community screening of the filmed stories these youth produce, which will then be available on a public website.

“The humanities help us study our past, understand our present, and prepare for our future,” says NEH Chairman William D. Adams. “The National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to support projects that will benefit all Americans and remind us of our shared human experience.”

 

Image Credit:
Close up of Child Migrant Quilt Project (September 2014)
© Ana Rosa Ventura-Molina 2014

12/6/16

By Jessica Anderson | The Baltimore Sun

"One photograph shows a National Guardsman in fatigues outside Harborplace. Another captures a large crowd gathered outside Penn Station. A third shows young boys riding bicycles past marchers carrying signs that read "Justice 4 Freddie Carlos Gray."

"The more than 12,000 images — some taken by seasoned photographers, others by ordinary people with cellphones —form one part of "Baltimore Stories: Narratives and the Life of an American City."

"The yearlong project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, aimed to "contextualize narratives of race," organizers said. The Dresher Center for the Humanities in the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences hosted the event, and the project was a collaboration among the University of Maryland's College of Arts and Humanities, Maryland Humanities, and others."

Read the complete article at The Baltimore Sun.

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