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The College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland announces the “2017-18 Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias.” Featuring Theo Wilson, Bobby Seale and Mara Liasson, this year’s speakers consider what it means to engage in courageous conversations that speak to the difficult issues of hate and bias across personal, political and historical frames. Each lecture is an opportunity for the campus and the UMD community to join together for provocative conversations about resisting these issues.

The Personal: Theo Wilson (@lucifury)

Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 5:30 p.m.

Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

Award-winning slam poet and social justice advocate who skyrocketed to social media fame after posting beliefs about hate and bias will discuss his experience as a black man who went undercover in alt-right social media communities.

The Historical: Bobby Seale (@BobbySealecom)

Thursday, February 1, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Orem Alumni Hall, Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center

Famed author and founding chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party will present “Resistance: From the Sixties to Trump,” which will be followed by a book signing and reception.

Co-sponsored by the Nathan and Jeanette Miller Center for Historical Studies and the Department of African American Studies at UMD. In partnership with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Political: Mara Liasson (@MaraLiasson)

Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

Award-winning journalist and NPR political correspondent with over 30 years of experience reporting on the White House and Congress will present “The Political Landscape: Dealing with Hate and Bias in Washington.”

In collaboration with the Philip Merrill College of Journalism.

For free tickets or more information call 301.405.ARTS.

The Arts & Humanities Dean's Lecture Series provides an opportunity for the college faculty, students and staff to join together with colleagues across campus for stimulating conversation about issues that cross our disciplines. Lectures and performances may address either enduring or emerging questions central to the arts and humanities, or questions arising from other disciplines to which the arts and humanities might speak. In addition to presenting a major public event, each lecturer interacts in smaller settings with faculty, graduate students and/or undergraduates. 

Images: 

1. Theo Wilson: Photo by Woody Roseland via Westword

2. Bobby Seale: Photo by Carlos Avila Gonzalez via The Chronicle

3. Mara Liasson, Photo by New Hampshire Public Radio via WBAA.org

 

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5/29/17

By Michele Kennerly and Carly S. Woods | Eidolon

"Arms akimbo, Wonder Woman stands with one well-greaved leg in the ancient world and one in ours. The imminent release of the first full-length, live-action Wonder Woman film is an occasion for classical reception work that joins dynamic efforts already underway on the classics and comics and the classics and modern fantasy. The decades of interpretive enthusiasm Wonder Woman has inspired, however, make it difficult to put a new spin on things.

"So we stake our claim in the old: the story and history of Wonder Woman are suggestive of the ancient (yet enduring) habit of talking about influence, obedience, and persuasion through a gender-based idiom of power. Furthermore, the “persuasion dimension” of Wonder Woman continues to gain depth in popular and political culture, though it is not always recognized."

Read their complete article at Eidolon.

Image: Red-Figure Amphora depicting combat of Greeks against Amazons, attributed to the Suessula Painter (ca. 400 BCE). Via Eidolon.

 

3/30/17

By Mabinty Quarshie | USA Today

"When Bill O'Reilly insulted Rep. Maxine Water's hair and White House press secretary Sean Spicer told reporter April Ryan to "stop shaking your head," the comments by the two white men hit a nerve.

"Black women — who often face a one-two punch of racism and sexism in their daily lives — immediately took to social media using the hashtag #BlackWomenAtWork to air out their grievances, including those about other women.

" 'The things that black women need to push for are quite different than what we think of as the mainstream feminist movement,' said Sheri Parks, a professor of American studies at the University of Maryland and author of Fierce Angels: The Strong Black Woman in American Life and Culture."

Read the complete article at USA Today

Baltimore Stories: Reworking Baltimore's Stories & Identities Chesapeake Art Center
9/28/16 - 8:00 PM

The 3rd event of the Baltimore Stories Art of Transformation series

Baltimore Stories: Building Public Humanities Baltimore Stories Caolitions
10/28/16 - 8:00 PM

A community conversation about the importance of coalitions in building democracy, fostering social justice, and improving Baltimore’s future.

Baltimore Stories: Morrell Park: A Community Conversation Event
11/16/16 - 7:00 PM

The 4th Baltimore Stories Art of Transformation event: Morrell Park: A Community Conversation Event.

Baltimore Stories: Narrative 4 Story Exchange
11/15/16 - 7:00 PM

Baltimore Stories: Narrative 4 engages a group of Baltimore high school students and Baltimore first responders in a structured story exchange as a way to break down barriers and increase empathy.

Baltimore Stories Events Highlight Video

Highlights from the Baltimore Stories project. The initiative was a year long project of 20 events used to promote empathy through the sharing of stories and narratives. 
The Bal...

POET & MACARTHUR GENIUS CLAUDIA RANKINE VISITS UMD FOR 2016-17 WORLDWISE ARTS AND HUMANITIES DEAN'S LECTURE SERIES

Claudia Rankine read from her acclaimed book "Citizen" and spoke about the relationships between race, art and citizenship.

11/11/16

Tom Hall | "Midday" WYPR

"On November 8th, voters chose Donald Trump to be the next President. As Americans come to terms with the idea of a Trump presidency, many questions still remain. What does the election of Donald Trump tell us about our country’s apparent embrace of unprecedented change, and what does it tell us about what Americans are repudiating? Is this a repudiation of civility in politics?  Is it an embrace of isolationism, and a repudiation of tolerance? Is it, as Mr. Trump suggested early this morning, a cry from those who have been forgotten, or is it a mean-spirited and fear-fueled affirmation of a system that favors white people over people of color? "

Listen to the complete postcast on WYPR

Image: Hillary Clinton supporters emotional at campaign headquarters. Via WYPR.

 

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