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2/2/18

By Jillian Atelsek | The Diamondback

"As he arrived at the podium to deafening applause and a standing ovation, Bobby Seale raised his hands, stepped back and chuckled.

"'Reminds me of the '60s,' he said.

"Seale, the co-founder of the Black Panther Party, a political activist and a cultural icon, spoke at the University of Maryland on Thursday night about organized resistance and strength in the face of discrimination and oppression.

"'I don't believe in riots,' he said. 'I believe in organizing. I believe in putting my machine together.'"

Read the complete article in The Diamondback.

Photo: Black Panther Party co-founder Bobby Seale addressed University of Maryland students and faculty on Thursday, Feb. 1. (Richard Moglen/The Diamondback)

Description: The second lecture in the “2017-18 Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias” features Bobby Seale, the founding chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party. Seale will present “Resistance: From the Sixties to Trump,” which will be followed by a book signing and reception. This event is co-sponsored by the Nathan and Jeanette Miller Center for Historical Studies and the Department of African American Studies, in partnership with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Who: Bobby Seale is the founding co-chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party, a revolutionary civil and human rights organization active in the United States from 1966-1982. Seale is the author of several books, including “Seize the Time: The Story of the Black Panther Party and Huey P. Newton” and “A Lonely Rage: The Autobiography of Bobby Seale.” His most recent book is “Power to the People: The World of the Black Panthers”

What: The famed civil and human rights activist Bobby Seale discusses the history of civil rights resistance from the 1960s to our present moment. A book signing of his most recent book, “Power to the People: The World of the Black Panthers,” will follow the lecture.

When: Thursday, February 1, 2018, 5:30 PM

Where: Orem Alumni Hall, Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center. 7801 Alumni Dr, College Park, MD 20742

Why: This event is the second lecture in the “2017-18 Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias.” The first lecture featured poet and social justice activist Theo Wilson, and the third lecture will feature Mara Liasson, NPR political correspondent. This year’s speakers consider what it means to engage in courageous conversations that speak to the difficult issues of hate and bias across personal, political and historical frames. Each lecture is an opportunity for the campus and the UMD community to join together for provocative conversations about resisting these issues.

How: The event is free but an RSVP is recommended. Members of the press should contact K. Lorraine Graham, Communications Manager, to RSVP.

ABOUT THE SERIES:

The Arts & Humanities Dean's Lecture Series provides an opportunity for the college faculty, students and staff to join together with colleagues across campus for stimulating conversation about issues that cross our disciplines. Lectures and performances may address either enduring or emerging questions central to the arts and humanities, or questions arising from other disciplines to which the arts and humanities might speak. In addition to presenting a major public event, each lecturer interacts in smaller settings with faculty, graduate students and/or undergraduates.

The College of Arts and Humanities extends its congratulations to outstanding faculty who have been named 2017-18 recipients of the Creative and Performing Arts Awards (CAPAA) or Research and Scholarship Awards (RASA) from the University of Maryland’s Graduate School.

ABOUT CAPAA:

CAPPA supports artistic activities and are awarded to full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty. Faculty who receive a semester award are excused from teaching duties during the period for which the CAPAA was granted. Those who receive a summer CAPAA will receive a $9,000 stipend for two months during the summer for which the award is granted. To be eligible for the summer award, the faculty member needs to hold a 9 – 9 ½ appointment, which means they do not have teaching responsibilities over the summer. The most recent CAPAA summer awardees will apply the award to summer 2017.

ARHU’s semester CAPAA recipients include:

Joshua Weiner, Department of English

Helen Huang, School of Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies

 

ARHU’s summer CAPAA recipients include:

Cy Keener, Department of Art

Brandon Morse, Department of Art

Gabrielle Fuentes, Department of English

Sarah Frisof, School of Music

 

ABOUT RASA:

RASA are awarded to full-time tenure and tenure-track faculty. The awards support research and scholarship. Faculty who receive a semester award are excused from teaching duties during the period for which the RASA was granted. Faculty who receive a summer RASA will receive a $9,000 stipend for two months during the summer for which the award is granted. To be eligible for the summer award, the faculty member needs to hold a 9 – 9 ½ appointment, which means they do not have teaching responsibilities over the summer. The most recent RASA summer awardees will apply the award to summer 2017.

ARHU semester RASA Recipients:

Andrew Schonebaum, School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Alexis Lothian, Department of Women's Studies

Ali Abasi, School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Damien Pfister, Department of Communication

Randy Ontiveros, Department of English

Janelle Wong, Department of American Studies

Jan Padios, Department of American Studies

ARHU summer RASA Recipients:

Antoine Borrut, Department of History

 

The College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Maryland announces the “2017-18 Dean’s Lecture Series: Courageous Conversations, ARHU Resists Hate And Bias.” Featuring Theo Wilson, Bobby Seale and Mara Liasson, this year’s speakers consider what it means to engage in courageous conversations that speak to the difficult issues of hate and bias across personal, political and historical frames. Each lecture is an opportunity for the campus and the UMD community to join together for provocative conversations about resisting these issues.

The Personal: Theo Wilson (@lucifury)

Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 5:30 p.m.

Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

Award-winning slam poet and social justice advocate who skyrocketed to social media fame after posting beliefs about hate and bias will discuss his experience as a black man who went undercover in alt-right social media communities.

The Historical: Bobby Seale (@BobbySealecom)

Thursday, February 1, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Orem Alumni Hall, Samuel Riggs IV Alumni Center

Famed author and founding chairman and national organizer of the Black Panther Party will present “Resistance: From the Sixties to Trump,” which will be followed by a book signing and reception.

Co-sponsored by the Nathan and Jeanette Miller Center for Historical Studies and the Department of African American Studies at UMD. In partnership with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Political: Mara Liasson (@MaraLiasson)

Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Gildenhorn Recital Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

Award-winning journalist and NPR political correspondent with over 30 years of experience reporting on the White House and Congress will present “The Political Landscape: Dealing with Hate and Bias in Washington.”

In collaboration with the Philip Merrill College of Journalism.

For free tickets or more information call 301.405.ARTS.

The Arts & Humanities Dean's Lecture Series provides an opportunity for the college faculty, students and staff to join together with colleagues across campus for stimulating conversation about issues that cross our disciplines. Lectures and performances may address either enduring or emerging questions central to the arts and humanities, or questions arising from other disciplines to which the arts and humanities might speak. In addition to presenting a major public event, each lecturer interacts in smaller settings with faculty, graduate students and/or undergraduates. 

Images: 

1. Theo Wilson: Photo by Woody Roseland via Westword

2. Bobby Seale: Photo by Carlos Avila Gonzalez via The Chronicle

3. Mara Liasson, Photo by New Hampshire Public Radio via WBAA.org

 

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Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture, Parren J. Mitchell Art/Sociology Bldg
Friday, May 05, 2017 - 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

The records produced by the Freedmen's Bureau are the richest source of information on the African American experience post-Civil War.

1/26/17

By Christine Condon and Danielle Ohl | The Diamondback

"President Trump plans to defund the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, a move that could jeopardize funding for the arts and humanities at the University of Maryland and in this state.

"A Jan. 19 report in The Hill detailed a meeting between White House staff and Trump's transition team, who fleshed out a plan to cut back on bureaucracy and government spending. The plan included eliminating the two endowments, which have granted this university about $2.5 million for research, performances and projects since 2010.

" '[The NEH and NEA] have been important in a lot of ways,' said arts and humanities college Dean Bonnie Dill. 'They are a very important part of the work that we do.' "

Read the complete story online at The Diamondback.

Image: The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. (File photo/The Diamondback).

Parren J. Mitchell Art-Sociology Building, Room 4213
Monday, November 14, 2016 - 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

Learn about projects that seek to transcribe the Freedmen's Bureau Records, the richest source of information on the African American experience post-Civil War.

Parren J. Mitchell Art-Sociology Building, Room 4213
Friday, November 18, 2016 - 10:00 AM to 2:30 PM

Join us online or in person to help transcribe the Freedmen's Bureau Records, the richest source of information on the African American experience post-Civil War.

Stamp Student Union, University of Maryland
Thursday, October 06, 2016 - 8:00 AM to Friday, October 07, 2016 - 6:30 PM

This conference explores the systematic criminalization of migration in many western liberal democracies.

Worldwise Arts Humanities Dean's Lecture Series Featuring Annette Gordon-reed

Historian Annette Gordon-Reed was on campus Feb. 27, 2014 discussing her groundbreaking book, "Thomas Jefferson & Sally Hemings: An American Controversy."

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