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Dean's Lecture Series

Worldwise Arts Humanities Dean's Lecture Series Featuring Anthony Romero

The college presented American Civil Liberties Union Executive Director Anthony Romero in the third installment of the 2013-14 Arts and Humanities Dean's Lecture Series.

Worldwise Arts Humanities Dean's Lecture Series Featuring Annette Gordon-reed

Historian Annette Gordon-Reed was on campus Feb. 27, 2014 discussing her groundbreaking book, "Thomas Jefferson & Sally Hemings: An American Controversy."

Award-winning Actor John Lithgow visits Campus for  2013-14 WORLDWISE Arts and Humanities Dean’s Lecture Series
11/19/13 - 7:00 PM

Lithgow discusses “Heart of the Matter” report on the value of the humanities and “Stories By Heart,” the power of storytelling.

Worldwise Arts and Humanities Dean's Lecture Series presents Cathy Davidson

The College of Arts and Humanities held a powerful conversation with professor, scholar and author, Cathy Davidson.

Worldwise Arts and Humanities Dean's Lecture Series presents Chimamanda Adichie

The College of Arts and Humanities presented 2008 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship recipient and award-winning Nigerian author, Chimamanda Adichie.

3/22/16

By Ashley O'Connor, The Diamondback

Photo courtesy of Victoria Robinson

In light of the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities government agencies, a panel met with the University of Maryland's arts and humanities college to discuss the agencies' status and their place in the future.

Jane Chu, the 11th chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, and William Adams, the 10th chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, joined Bonnie Thornton Dill, the arts and humanities dean, for the discussion Tuesday evening at the Gildenhorn Recital Hall in the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center.

"We want all Americans to have an opportunity to be involved in the arts," Chu said.

Sheri Parks, the college's associate dean for research, interdisciplinary scholarship and programming, moderated the conversation in front of about 40 people.

Parks asked the panelists how they believe the arts and humanities can be better integrated in today's society, in which the arts are commonly cut out of school budgets. Entering her current position, Dill said, she had to explain the value it has for students, families and future generations.

Chu said a major problem in declining arts education programs is a lack of participation.

"Eleven million Americans want to participate in the arts, but don't," she said.

Many people who have mobility difficulties could have trouble getting to arts and humanities centers, or feel there are challenges to bringing kids to access the arts, but these barriers can be broken down, Chu said. She mentioned she would like to see arts programs implemented in all public schools.

It's important to show that art education not only provides a skill set, but can also be correlated with better performance in other classes, Chu said. For example, she said, a recent study revealed a correlation between art classes and higher grades in science classes.

"The pipeline is about making kids able to think wisely and be creative, not necessarily like the arts," Chu said.

Read more here.

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