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ARHU Graduate Student Travel Awards 2017-2018 

 

To support the professional development of its graduate students through the presentation of original research, the College of Arts and Humanities awards travel monies to significant national and international conferences. There will be three competitions per year with approximately nine awards given in each competition. 

 

Eligible expenses include transportation, lodging, registration fees and per diem for food. 

 

General Guidelines: 

Up to $500 for travel within North America and $700 for international travel. 

 

Priority will be given to students attending national or international conferences of major professional organizations. ARHU particularly seeks to help students toward the end of their graduate careers gain experience and make contacts important to their intellectual and professional development and to their job prospects. However, the Fellowship Committee will hold aside a certain amount of funding for students presenting original work at prestigious conferences early in their careers (e.g., before advancing to candidacy). 

 

Preference will be given to students who have not had an ARHU Travel Award in the past, unless it was an early career award. Awards will not be given for travel that has already taken place. 

 

These applications must be entered on time into the online system to be considered for the current cycle. The online application system will close at midnight on each of the three deadline dates below. 

 

College deadlines (for students and departments to submit materials online):

  • Round 1: Monday, October 2, 2017 (for travel taking place between October 1, 2017 and December 3, 2017) 
  • Round 2: Monday, December 4, 2017 (for travel taking place between December 4, 2017 to May 6, 2018) 
  • Round 3: Monday, May 7, 2018 (for travel taking place between May 7, 2018 to September 30, 2018) 

Please check with the individual program graduate director about departmental deadlines. 

 

The application process for Travel Awards is entirely online. No paper applications will be accepted. 

 

The application process is easy: 

Students should go to http://apply.arhu.umd.edu and click on Travel Awards, provide all the supporting information, and submit the application. (Students can work on an application, save, and come back to the site as well, so they don’t have to do everything at once). 

 

The supporting information requested is as follows: 

• Short CV (including up-to-date contact information and address)

• Letter of application including:

  • Stage of graduate career (e.g., defending dissertation in Fall 2016)
  • Brief description (no more than two paragraphs) of the research to be presented, its significance in the field, and the format of the presentation (e.g. paper on a panel, poster presentation). Please keep in mind that the research should be contextualized for non-specialists.
  • Brief description of the conference and its organizing body, including the url of the conference/organization website. Include a statement of the review process for the accepted research.
  • Statement of the contribution the conference will make to your career.
  • Statement of whether application has been made for this trip to other funding sources (e.g. Goldhaber Travel Awards from the Graduate School).  Students are encouraged to apply for outside funding.
  • Budget of estimated costs
  • Copy of the letter/email accepting/inviting the presentation

If you encounter any technical problems using the online system, please contact Megan Weng.  https://apply.arhu.umd.edu/contact

 

If you have questions about the Travel Awards themselves, or if your students have questions, please contact Trevor Parry-Giles, 301-641-0019 or tpg@umd.edu

 

Monday, December 04, 2017 - 5:00 PM

Details on the James F. Harris Arts and Humanities Visionary Scholarship.

Monday, October 02, 2017 - 5:00 PM

The College of Arts and Humanities awards grants for travel to significant national and international conferences.

0301 Hornbake Library, MITH Conference Room
Thursday, April 06, 2017 - 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM

Join this narrative of how blackness shapes the experiences of space and place across time.

Tawes Hall 0330
Wednesday, May 03, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Reflect on how scholars use newly acquired approaches to cultivate and refine their empirical orientation.

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Theorizing “The Archive” explores one of the fundamental tools of black digital scholarship.

0301 Hornbake Library
Thursday, May 04, 2017 - 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM

Representing Movement introduces GIS that support simulations of travel, movement, and migration.

0301 Hornbake Library
Monday, May 01, 2017 - 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

Representing Movement introduces GIS that support simulations of travel, movement, and migration.

3/7/17

By Tom Hall & Bridget Armstrong | Midday on WYPR

"The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities are two of 17 federal agencies that appear to be targeted by the Trump administration for elimination, as its budget inclinations lean heavily toward defense spending. The state of Maryland funded arts institutions at the highest level ever last year, and the Governor has proposed an additional $1 million this year, bringing the allocation for the arts to $21 million in Fiscal Year 2018. Ironically, Baltimore City Schools are facing drastic cuts. Principals looking to trim expenses, may have to make cuts to music and visual arts programs. 

"An organization called Arts Every Day is holding a symposium this weekend that will call attention to the role that arts education plays in boosting attendance, improving test scores and making schools vibrant parts of their communities.

"Tom and Dr. Sheri Parks speak with arts educators and advocates about what the arts can do for kids and their families. They also talk about the cost of funding arts programs and if that cost is worth it when belts are being tightened locally and nationally."

Listen to the complete podcast: Midday on WYPR

1/30/17

ANNOUNCING THE SOCIETY FOR TEXTUAL SCHOLARSHIP’S 2017 CFP  

 

The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) and the Andrew W. Mellon-funded African American Digital Humanities Initiative (AADHum) invite your participation in “Textual Embodiments,” the Society for Textual Scholarship’s International Interdisciplinary Conference for 2017.

 

Date: Wednesday, May 31 - Friday, June 2, 2017

Location: University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland USA

Program Chairs: Neil Fraistat, Purdom Lindblad, Catherine Knight Steele, Raffaele Viglianti

Deadline for Proposals: February 26, 2017

Keynote speakers: Marisa Parham (Amherst University)

                       Susan Brown  (University of Guelph)

 

Our conference theme is "Textual Embodiments," broadly construed. With this theme we hope to engage a range of issues involving the materiality of texts, including their physical, virtual, or performative manifestations as objects that can decay or break down and can potentially be repaired and sustained over time. It also concerns the processes of inclusion and exclusion through which bodies of texts take shape in the form of editions, archives, collections, and exhibition building, as well as the ethical responsibilities faced by textual scholars, archivists, conservationists, media archeologists, digital resource creators, and cultural heritage professionals engaging in these processes.

 

As always, the conference is open to submissions involving interdisciplinary discussion of current research into particular aspects of textual work: the discovery, enumeration, description, bibliographical analysis, editing, annotation, mark-up, and sustainability of texts in disciplines such as cultural studies, literature, history, musicology, classical and biblical studies, philosophy, art history, legal history, history of science and technology, computer science, library and information science, archives, lexicography, epigraphy, paleography, codicology, cinema studies, new media studies, game studies, theater, linguistics, and textual and literary theory. Considerations of the role of computational methodologies, tools, and technologies in textual theory and practice are of course welcome, as are papers addressing aspects of archival theory and practice as they pertain to textual criticism and scholarly editing.

 

Especially welcome are interdisciplinary papers addressing the theme of Textual Embodiment in the fields of Black Diaspora Studies, Indigenous Studies, LGBTQ Studies, Latinx Studies, Disability Studies, Women’s Studies, and Critical Theory.

 

Submissions may take the following traditional forms:

1. Papers. Papers should be no more than 20 minutes in length, making a significant original contribution to scholarship. Papers that are primarily reports or demonstrations of tools or projects are discouraged.

2.    Panels. Panels may consist of either three associated papers or four to six roundtable speakers. Roundtables should address topics of broad interest and scope, with the goal of fostering lively debate with audience participation.

3.    Workshops. Workshops should propose a specific problem, tool, or skill set for which the workshop leader will provide expert guidance and instruction. Examples might be an introduction to forensic computing or paleography. Workshop proposals that are accepted will be announced on the conference Web site (http://www.textual.org) and attendees will be required to enroll with the workshop leader(s).

4. Submissions may also take the form of Open Fishbowl sessions. Drawing on the expertise of both speakers and attendees, Fishbowls are small group discussions in which 5 initial participants face one another in a circle, in the middle of the larger audience. Participants cycle out as audience members join the inner circle to create dialogue across perspectives and different types of research. Submitted proposals should include a brief statement as to the core idea or theme for the fishbowl, emphasizing its relation to conference themes or relevance to the larger Textual Studies community. Naming some or all of the initial five “fish” is encouraged. Potential topics for Fishbowl session might include, for example, “Minimal Computing, Globalized Editions,” “Participatory Editions,” and “#ArchivesSoWhite.”

 

Proposals for all formats should include a title; abstract (250 words max.) of the proposed paper, panel, seminar, or workshop; and name, email address, and institutional affiliation for all participants. Format should be clearly indicated. Seminar, fishbowl, and workshop proposals in particular should take care to articulate the imagined audience and any expectations of prior knowledge or preparation.

 

All abstracts should indicate what if any technological support will be required.

Inquiries and proposals should be submitted electronically to https://goo.gl/forms/B6xi4SmZAkmwWB9o2/. Responses will be sent by March 10.

 

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